Maíz Flor Serpiente/Maize Flower Serpent for Smithsonian #LVMDayofDead Celebración

Anthrodesign, Art, El Salvador, Frida Larios, Graphic Design, Guatemala, Honduras, Indigenous, Indigo, Journey, PotencialPuro

Join us October 31, 2015 for the unveiling of Maíz Flor Serpiente/Maize Flower Serpent. Frida Larios and Manuel León from Indigenous Design Collective will show the final mural and talk about the creative process interpreting Macuilxochitzin.

Maíz Flor Serpiente/Maize Flower, a Smithsonian Latino Center commissioned digital piece from the Indigenous Design Collective. Work based on the 2015 Smithsonian Latino Virtual Museum Day of the Dead Festival cultural identity character, Macuilxochitzin.

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About Indigenous Design Collective and Maíz Flor Serpiente/Maize Flower Serpent

We are designers interpreting our cultural heritage through typo-graphy and art. Our collective aims to make Maya hieroglyphs and Indigenous art (not only Maya,) more accessible to the public, both children and adults, by applying them to different visual media.

We have chosen to illustrate the texture of a huipil to represent Macuilxochitzin; we find inspiring the fact that the art of backstrap weaving is still taught to the girls in Mesoamerica just as it was done with the princess back in the days.

“Every morning, you don your white huipil, iridescent embroidering on cotton, printed symbol of the plumed serpent, evolution. Black tresses floating in the air, tangling with the threads of the voice of Ehécatl, God of Wind.” Xanath Caraza, Weaver of Words.

In our iconographic process we first created a pattern based on the symbology of her name, Macuilxochitzin, which means: 5 Flower. The feathered serpent enters the composition as a vision embroidered on Macuilxochitzin’s huipil. When you look at the design in detail you will find that the feathers around the serpent are gracious maize leaves (“milpa”) and that the serpent’s scales also incorporate her flowers’ petals.

For more information on the Latino Virtual Museum Day of the Dead Real/Virtual Festival, visit latino.si.edu/LVM. Connect with the Smithsonian Latino Virtual Museum on Twitter and Instagram @Smithsonian_LVM

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Reblogged from Smithsonian LVM: http://lvmdayofdead.tumblr.com

Exploring Cultural Identity by Smithsonian #LVMDayofDead Celebración

Anthrodesign, Art, Design, El Salvador, Frida Larios, Graphic Design, Guatemala, Indigenous, Journey

“We have chosen to illustrate the texture of a huipil to represent Macuilxochitzin; we find inspiring the fact that the art of backstrap weaving is still taught to the girls in Mesoamerica just as it was done with the princess back in the days…”

Frida Larios & Manuel León, Indigenous Design Collective

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Follow the creative process of Frida Larios and Manuel León, as they visually interpret our LVM Day of the Dead cultural figure, Macuilxochitzin. They would reveal their final piece during the  Dead Poets Virtual Reading & Open Mic Hosted by Mouthfeel Press. Join us this Saturday, Oct.31, 9:30 pm EST at the UTEP Second Life island-LVM Placita-Sin Fronteras Café.

For more information on the Latino Virtual Museum Day of the Dead Real/Virtual Festival, visit latino.si.edu/LVM. Connect with the Smithsonian Latino Virtual Museum on Twitter and Instagram  @Smithsonian_LVM

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Reblog from Smithsonian LVM: http://lvmdayofdead.tumblr.com

Talk: Ancient glyphs inspiring new Maya design at the Smithsonian Latino Center

Anthrodesign, Art, El Salvador, Guatemala, Talk, Washington DC

Published by Hola Cultura, Washington, DC, June, 2015

A Maya-inspired design by Frida Larios. Photo by Oliver Garretson

A Maya-inspired design by Frida Larios. Photo by Tyler Orsburn

At the Smithsonian Latino Center recently, two designers decked out in colorful Central American outfits discussed how the ancient art of their Mayan ancestors influences their work; a design methodology that goes beyond  artistic endeavor.

Frida Larios, an ambassador for the International Design Network, is the creator of the New Maya Language; a multimedia design project. She is an author, lecturer, facilitator, typography consultant and educational product designer. Originally from El Salvador, she sported a contemporary tunic styled with modernized indigenous symbols at the May 28 talk.

Manuel León is a multimedia graphic designer originally from Chichicastenago, Guatemala. He is the owner of the design studio Potencial Puro and the art director and website designer for the United States Institute of Peace.León was dressed head-to-toe in traditional Maya clothing.

While the indigenous regalia looked a bit out of place in the conference room of the Center’s Southwest Washington D.C. office building, they had the full attention of the small audience of Smithsonian staffers and others who take special interest in Latino or indigenous cultures.

Larios and León are in the midst of creating a Maya design collective dedicated to Maya knowledge, symbolism, and preservation of their identity as indigenous people.

Their similar methodologies and values brought them together. They draw a deep influence from the Maya to inspire new art forms, while using ancient symbolism as a means to inspire people of Mayan descent to take an interest in their rich cultural heritage. They look to inspire others to take an interest in their heritage as Mayans and build a common understanding of its relevance. It’s a design methodology that could be used with other indigenous cultures to help people discover aspects of their identity in the same way it helped Larios delve more deeply into her identity as a Salvadorian, she said.

By reinterpreting ancient symbols they aim to breath new life into them. Larios said they envision their Maya design collective will “preserve our heritage and make it relevant to today’s citizens, using design as a bridge.”

In other words, design is the medium through which they connect the past and the present by adapting the Mayan visual language in a way that is understood in today’s world. These changes could be seen as the changes any language goes through over the course of time. Likewise, adaptation prevents Mayan hieroglyphics from becoming merely the subject material for history books.

For Larios, pictograms are stories. In some of her work she utilizes pictograms everyone knows, like a skull and crossbones. Then, integrates this common symbol into modern symbols to create a new idea—a new Maya language. These symbols are incorporated into her various mediums such as clothing, jewelry, and art prints.

Manuel León, Awakening Ocelote

Manuel León, Awakening Ocelote

For León, his work is much more than art; philosophy inspires the story behind his visual designs. He said the book “Ensueños Cosmovisión Del Maiz” by Daniel Matul is a particularly guiding aspect with regard to his philosophy. Of the designs he presented, an image of an ocelot with four points stands out; a traditional glyph of an ocelot reinterpreted in mid-yawn. León named this visual interpretation “Awakening Ocelot”.

When asked how their work is perceived by the natives and community, they agreed it was welcomed, particularly children thoroughly enjoy it. Despite the interest children show in their work, they noted that there is certain competition when it comes inspiring children to take an interest in their cultural heritage. This competition comes from pop-culture phenomena, such the booming superhero movie franchises.

What is known of the Maya glyphs is largely from Archeological study. Larios’ and León’s reinterpretations often begin from these archeological interpretations. The Spanish Conquest was a breaking point in Maya culture; their language and the related knowledge of hieroglyphs were lost. Larios and León are trying to construct a conceptual bridge between the past and the
present.

“What you see here is not even the tip of the iceberg,” said Larios, referring to an entire lexicon of glyphs waiting to be integrated into a modern symbolism.

—Oliver Garretson

NUEVA VIDA #MAYA: Book, Paintings, Photo, Jewellery and Fashion Expo and Conference Opens Today

Art, Design, Fashion design, Frida Larios, Graphic Design, Guatemala, Jewellery Design, Language, Mexico, New Maya Language, Photography, Photojournalism, Sustainable Design, Tyler Orsburn

NUEVA VIDA MAYA

NEW MAYA LANGUAGE conference, book presentation, paintings, jewellery, and dress collection; and NEW MAYA LIFE wood-printed photography series in collaboration with my husband Tyler Orsburn, opens today at 18.30 at the Embassy of México in Guatemala.

La Embajada de México en Guatemala
tiene el gusto de invitarle a la inauguración
de la exposición y conferencia:

NUEVA VIDA MAYA

Libro, pintura, fotografía*, joyería y
textiles de la artista Frida Larios

Jueves 17 de enero del 2013
18.30 horas
Centro Cultural “Luis Cardoza y Aragón”
Embajada de México
*En colaboración con el fotoperiodista Tyler Orsburn
La muestra permanecerá abierta hasta el 22 de febrero
en horario de 9.00 a 17.00 horas de lunes a viernes

Announcing Conference, Book Presentation, and Solo Exhibition at the Embassy of Mexico in Guatemala

Art, Frida Larios, Guatemala, Language, Mexico, New Maya Language

Centro Cultural, Embajada de Mexico en Guatemala

His Excellency the Ambassador of México in Guatemala has confirmed a wonderful event to take place during January 2013, in which my full body of work will be exhibited, including: New Maya Language hand-painted pictographic poster series, jewellery, and dress collection.

The exhibition will be inaugurated with a keynote conference and presentation of my book–New Maya Language on Tuesday January 8, 2013 at the Centro Cultural de México ‘Luis Cardoza y Aragón’, Embassy of México in Guatemala.

This is the perfect celebration of the end of a 5,125 year cycle in the Maya Long Count calendar in 2012, and the beginning of a new one in 2013.