INTERNATIONAL AMBASSADOR ENCOURAGES STUDENTS TO EXPRESS THEMSELVES WITH MAYAN GLYPHS

Anthrodesign, Children, Design, El Salvador, Graphic Design, New Maya Language, Washington DC

POSTED ON OCTOBER 7, 2015

INTERNATIONAL AMBASSADOR ENCOURAGES STUDENTS TO EXPRESS THEMSELVES WITH MAYAN GLYPHS

Milagros Reyes, a 13-year-old from Buck Lodge Middle School in Hyattsville, was fascinated when she learned about a “mini version” of Pompeii in El Salvador.

She had been creating a story using Mayan glyphs, which she learned from Frida Larios, an award-winning typographic artist from El Salvador

Larios works as an artist and ambassador for the International Indigenous Design Network. She collaborates with cultural institutions in El Salvador, as well as at the Salvadoran embassy in Washington, where she facilitates workshops that encourage young Salvadorans in the U.S. to embrace their native culture through art.

She brought this knowledge to campus Tuesday as a part of “Imaging Homeland and Belonging.” The event took place in Stamp Student Union’s Art and Learning Center.

The workshop attracted a large and diverse group of students.

For those of Latino/a heritage, and it provided an opportunity for them to reflect on [part of] their cultural roots and their idea of home.

For Frankie Jovel, a senior and a member of Lambda Theta Phi, a Latino fraternity on campus, this event helped him get closer to his Salvadoran heritage.

“This motivates me to look into my culture,” Jovel said. He was using the glyphs to write a sentence about corn tamales, which he said he loves to eat.

As an introduction to the event, Larios presented on Mayan culture and history, in which she discussed the meaning of the ancient glyphs and distributed a colorful guide that showed the various designs along with their English meanings.

“The Mayas were such thinkers. They are the ones who invented the number zero. They had a whole cosmology with constellations and stars. They domesticated corn and they invented chocolate. We owe a lot of things to the Maya. So we need to learn about them like we learn about the Greeks,” Rodríguez said.

Larios said she wants to show that Mayan glyphs are deeply rooted within people of Central American origin.

“We are genetically drawn to these forms due to the fact that the [Mesoamerican Indigenous] lived 2,000 years—maybe less—but the time we were colonized was even shorter. We belong to the region. We are natives. By exposing young people to the language, there is greater capacity for learning, because there’s empathy,” Larios said.

With the help of archaeological experts, Larios is working to [preserve] Mayan script. She is illustrating in bright, contemporary style that is immediately attractive.

One of her projects is a children’s book titled, The Village that was Buried by an Erupting Volcano, which she wrote and illustrated using Mayan glyphs. The book tells the story of an indigenous Mayan village in El Salvador preserved under volcanic ash for nearly 1,500 years.

Known as the Joya de Cerén Archaeological Park, this village is now an UNESCO World Heritage Site.

“That’s my mission—to transmit cultural heritage in a ludic, interpretative manner, using design as a tool,” Larios said.

She also designed the uniforms that the Salvadoran team wore to the 2015 pan-American games in Toronto. The uniforms, which were inspired by traditional Salvadoran costumes, were white and blue and adorned with ancient Mayan symbols.

However, Larios says it isn’t easy to encourage people in El Salvador to wear traditional costumes.

“It was a challenge because of the lack of attachment to traditional costumes. It’s a stigma. It’s persecution against indigenous peoples because they represent the peasant class, the class that [historically started] upheavals,” Larios said.

Featured Photo Credit: Belqui Ríos, a senior family science major taking a course called “Great Themes of the Hispanic Literatures; Home, Homeland and Be/longings in U.S. Latina/o Texts.” For students like Ríos, the workshop provided an opportunity to reflect on their cultural roots and the idea of home. (Gabriela Martinez/For The Bloc)

Gabriela Martinez is a communications graduate assistant at the College of Arts and Humanities and may be reached at gcmdavila@gmail.com

Advertisements

Talk: Ancient glyphs inspiring new Maya design at the Smithsonian Latino Center

Anthrodesign, Art, El Salvador, Guatemala, Talk, Washington DC

Published by Hola Cultura, Washington, DC, June, 2015

A Maya-inspired design by Frida Larios. Photo by Oliver Garretson

A Maya-inspired design by Frida Larios. Photo by Tyler Orsburn

At the Smithsonian Latino Center recently, two designers decked out in colorful Central American outfits discussed how the ancient art of their Mayan ancestors influences their work; a design methodology that goes beyond  artistic endeavor.

Frida Larios, an ambassador for the International Design Network, is the creator of the New Maya Language; a multimedia design project. She is an author, lecturer, facilitator, typography consultant and educational product designer. Originally from El Salvador, she sported a contemporary tunic styled with modernized indigenous symbols at the May 28 talk.

Manuel León is a multimedia graphic designer originally from Chichicastenago, Guatemala. He is the owner of the design studio Potencial Puro and the art director and website designer for the United States Institute of Peace.León was dressed head-to-toe in traditional Maya clothing.

While the indigenous regalia looked a bit out of place in the conference room of the Center’s Southwest Washington D.C. office building, they had the full attention of the small audience of Smithsonian staffers and others who take special interest in Latino or indigenous cultures.

Larios and León are in the midst of creating a Maya design collective dedicated to Maya knowledge, symbolism, and preservation of their identity as indigenous people.

Their similar methodologies and values brought them together. They draw a deep influence from the Maya to inspire new art forms, while using ancient symbolism as a means to inspire people of Mayan descent to take an interest in their rich cultural heritage. They look to inspire others to take an interest in their heritage as Mayans and build a common understanding of its relevance. It’s a design methodology that could be used with other indigenous cultures to help people discover aspects of their identity in the same way it helped Larios delve more deeply into her identity as a Salvadorian, she said.

By reinterpreting ancient symbols they aim to breath new life into them. Larios said they envision their Maya design collective will “preserve our heritage and make it relevant to today’s citizens, using design as a bridge.”

In other words, design is the medium through which they connect the past and the present by adapting the Mayan visual language in a way that is understood in today’s world. These changes could be seen as the changes any language goes through over the course of time. Likewise, adaptation prevents Mayan hieroglyphics from becoming merely the subject material for history books.

For Larios, pictograms are stories. In some of her work she utilizes pictograms everyone knows, like a skull and crossbones. Then, integrates this common symbol into modern symbols to create a new idea—a new Maya language. These symbols are incorporated into her various mediums such as clothing, jewelry, and art prints.

Manuel León, Awakening Ocelote

Manuel León, Awakening Ocelote

For León, his work is much more than art; philosophy inspires the story behind his visual designs. He said the book “Ensueños Cosmovisión Del Maiz” by Daniel Matul is a particularly guiding aspect with regard to his philosophy. Of the designs he presented, an image of an ocelot with four points stands out; a traditional glyph of an ocelot reinterpreted in mid-yawn. León named this visual interpretation “Awakening Ocelot”.

When asked how their work is perceived by the natives and community, they agreed it was welcomed, particularly children thoroughly enjoy it. Despite the interest children show in their work, they noted that there is certain competition when it comes inspiring children to take an interest in their cultural heritage. This competition comes from pop-culture phenomena, such the booming superhero movie franchises.

What is known of the Maya glyphs is largely from Archeological study. Larios’ and León’s reinterpretations often begin from these archeological interpretations. The Spanish Conquest was a breaking point in Maya culture; their language and the related knowledge of hieroglyphs were lost. Larios and León are trying to construct a conceptual bridge between the past and the
present.

“What you see here is not even the tip of the iceberg,” said Larios, referring to an entire lexicon of glyphs waiting to be integrated into a modern symbolism.

—Oliver Garretson

Celebrate #HispanicHeritageMonth with author @FridaLarios. Join us today at 2pm!

Anthrodesign, Archaeological Site, Book, Children, El Salvador, Joya de Cerén, Reading, Washington DC

Published on Wednesday, September 17, 2014 – 9:49am

Celebre el Mes de la Herencia Hispana con la autora Frida Larios
Frida Larios

puzzle

Join us Saturday, Sept. 20 at 2 p.m. as author Frida Larios presents her book, The Village That Was Buried by an Erupting Volcano along with a workshop on the New Maya Language with the Green Child wooden puzzle.

Acompáñenos el sábado 20 de septiembre a las 2 p.m. donde la autora Frida Larios presentara su libro, La Aldea que fue Sepultada por un Volcán en Erupción, con un taller del Nuevo Lenguaje Maya.

#Frida, el lenguaje maya y Joya de Cerén

Art, El Salvador, Frida Larios, Graphic Design, New Maya Language, Washington DC

Publicado el 13/08/2014 a las 11:31:43 por Miguel Huezo Mixco, de su blog El Amigo Imaginario de el periódico ElFaro.net

Mural de Frida Larios en Joya de Cerén

Mural de Frida Larios en el Parque Arqueológico Joya de Cerén

El patrimonio ancestral necesita reinventarse, o muere. El diseño, por su capacidad de síntesis y de elaborar, interpretar y crear realidades, es una poderosa herramienta para representar y reanimar nuestro pasado. Con estos fines, Frida Larios ha creado un “nuevo lenguaje maya”.

El pasado no es un lugar “sagrado”. Los dioses no inspiraron a los creadores del Templo del Gran Jaguar, en Tikal, ni a los escultores de las estelas de Copán. Tampoco a los artesanos de Joya de Cerén. Lo “sagrado” se vuelve intocable y solo un grupo de elegidos goza de la potestad para cambiarlo. Ese tipo de ideas producen conductas arbitrarias.

La demolición del mural de Fernando Llort, en 2011, se intentó justificar diciendo que contenía signos ajenos a la tradición católica, y se acusó al artista de promoverse comercialmente, como si eso fuera pecado. Hay que ponerse alerta cuando se pontifica en nombre de la religión o de la ciencia…

Es conveniente recordar aquellos tristes acontecimientos, pues ahora hay quienes aseguran que el mural de Frida Larios en el Parque Arqueológico Joya de Cerén, en San Juan Opico, es una especie de profanación al espíritu de los ancestros. Muchos no pensamos igual, y consideramos que el mural le ha otorgado un nuevo brillo a ese extraordinario lugar.

Como en El Salvador no se ha dado un debate constructivo sobre los usos sociales del patrimonio, prevalece la idea de que la valoración del pasado es una atribución exclusiva de los historiadores, arqueólogos y restauradores. Pero no hay que olvidar que también los artistas tienen un papel central en esa tarea. Para el caso, el diseño, en sus múltiples ramas, es decisivo para que más gente aprecie y preserve su herencia patrimonial; como dice García Canclini: para que “el pasado tenga porvenir”.

El mural ofrece una versión de la destrucción del antiguo asentamiento de Joya de Cerén, ocurrida en el siglo VII de nuestra era, con una iconografía sustentada en la gráfica de los artesanos de la antigua aldea. La puesta en valor de Joya de Cerén, Patrimonio de la Humanidad, pasa, entre otras cosas, por la necesidad de que el relato del historiador y el del arqueólogo se intersecten y combinen con el del artista.

El Salvador posee un rico patrimonio cultural que sigue estando infravalorado y escasamente explotado. En parte, porque el asunto ha sido encarado con una estrategia conservacionista. La política cultural tiene un enorme desafío para vincularlo con otras redes conceptuales, como el turismo, la comunicación masiva, el entretenimiento, y también con el contexto social de desigualdad y pobreza que le sirve de marco. Esto nos abrirá a las posibilidades que ofrecen los nuevos lenguajes, incluido el del arte, para que el pasado nos importe, para que se vuelva actual.

Una muestra de la reciente producción de Frida Larios se exhibe en estos momentos en el museo Dongdaemun Design Plaza & Park (DDP), de Seúl, junto al de otros 14 diseñadores internacionales.

Una muestra de la reciente producción de Frida Larios se exhibe en estos momentos en el museo Dongdaemun Design Plaza & Park (DDP), de Seúl, junto al de otros 14 diseñadores internacionales.

Mandela en Xibalbá: una visión gráfica de Frida Larios

Africa, Art, Design, El Salvador, Frida Larios, Graphic Design, Honduras, Language, New Maya Language, South Africa, Tegucigalpa, Tyler Orsburn

Frida Larios, artista creadora del Nuevo Lenguaje #Maya: “Hay gente que vio el libro y lloró…” – ElFaro.net

Art, Design, Frida Larios, Graphic Design, Language, London, New Maya Language

“Hay gente que vio el libro y lloró porque lo vio como una ventana a algo que no entendían” – ElFaro.net.

Frida Larios, artista creadora del Nuevo Lenguaje Maya:

“Hay gente que vio el libro y lloró porque lo vio como una ventana a algo que no entendían”

Más de 2 mil jeroglíficos mayas han sido descifrados desde 1950 hasta la fecha, pero poco se ha conocido al respecto fuera del mundo académico. La diseñadora y artista salvadoreña Frida Larios ha empezado a reducir esta brecha con una audaz propuesta de escribir la actualidad con símbolos mayas. También habla críticamente sobre el panorama local para los artistas visuales.

Por María Luz Nóchez / Fotos: José Carlos Reyes

Publicado el 5 de Febrero de 2013

En su afán por salir de lo cotidiano y harta del minimalismo que empezaba a diluirse en la capital británica, la diseñadora salvadoreña Frida Larios decidió empezar su ruta hacia el Nuevo Lenguaje Maya. Desde antes de partir a Londres, Larios ya había empezado a experimentar con lo vernáculo y lo folclórico en sus diseños. Sus intenciones eran claras: quería estudiar las raíces culturales de El Salvador. En 2003, la diseñadora partió a la prestigiosa Central Saint Martins College of Arts and Desing, en Inglaterra. Para llegar hasta allá presentó un proyecto cultural aún sin definir para postularse y obtener una beca.

Larios ha creado un sistema visual y conceptual inspirado en el sistema de signos de los mayas. Su metodología se basa en rediseñar y aplicar a la vida contemporánea el sistema de símbolos de los mayas, intercambiando uno de los elementos de un significado por uno socialmente reconocido. Para ponerlo en marcha se auxilió de epígrafos, antropólogos, investigadores y, sobre todo, de la experiencia de vivir en la Hacienda San Lucas, en Santa Rosa de Copán (Honduras), en donde, según dice, aún se siente la presencia de Yax Kuk Mo, el primer rey de Copán.

Aunque su máster en comunicación del diseño complementó su perspectiva como artista visual para encontrar la fuerza de lectura y reconocimiento de los jeroglíficos que ha rediseñado, su interés por difundir sus raíces culturales lo relaciona con los 12 años en que representó al país como voleibolista de playa. “Es una mezcla bien rara, deporte y arte”, bromea, y reconoce que viajar a Brasil, Portugal y Estados Unidos y conocer la cultura de estos países fue parte de su inspiración y determinación para promover la propia, tomando como base el desconocimiento que en Mesoamérica se tiene sobre los más de 2 mil jeroglíficos que han sido descifrados hasta la fecha. Cabe destacar que lo más que enseña el sistema educativo sobre los símbolos mayas son los números.

Frida Larios, diseñadora gráfica, artista visual e investigadora salvadoreña. Embajadora de la Red Internacional de Diseño Indígena (Indigo por sus siglas en inglés), un proyecto en línea de diseño para promover las raíces culturales.
Frida Larios, diseñadora gráfica, artista visual e investigadora salvadoreña. Embajadora de la Red Internacional de Diseño Indígena (Indigo por sus siglas en inglés), un proyecto en línea de diseño para promover las raíces culturales.

Ahora, la artista y diseñadora representa a Centroamérica como embajadora de la Red Internacional de Diseño Indígena (Indigo), plataforma en línea que por medio de la práctica del diseño contribuye a la formación de identidades culturales. Su boleto de entrada fue su primera serie del Nuevo Lenguaje Maya que narra la historia del sitio arqueológico Joya de Cerén, ubicado al occidente de San Salvador. Esta primera serie se complementa con las aplicaciones que de estos conceptos la artista ha realizado en textiles, joyería, juguetes educativos e identidades de marca.

Una década de estar fuera de El Salvador no es algo que le juegue en contra a la hora de verter sus opiniones respecto a la manera en que se maneja visualmente la identidad cultural. Por el contrario, observar desde el exterior le permite tener una perspectiva más amplia y crítica sobre las cosas que está haciendo mal el sistema para promover a los artistas.

¿Cómo nació el interés por lo precolombino estando en Londres, una ciudad en donde no existe un referente inmediato de la cultura maya?
Sí, lo precolombino es lo último que se viene a la mente estando en Londres… pero precisamente ese ambiente que es tan avant garde, de romper esquemas, y con una tradición artística muy diferente a la de París, que es más femenina, te reta más. En 2004, cuando tomé la decisión de dedicarme a trabajar con los jeroglíficos, ya estaba un poco hastiada del minimalismo y decidí trabajar con las formas mayas, que son intrínsecas, orgánicas y todo tenía un simbolismo, y eso es lo que me fascina del pensamiento de los artistas mayas.

Más de 2 mil jeroglíficos han sido descifrados desde 1950, pero en su libro nos presenta alrededor de 25 nuevos.
Es mi pasión. Yo fundé un estudio de diseño gráfico hace 10 años acá en El Salvador y desde entonces ya tenía esas inquietudes, ya tenía esa filosofía y esa visión. Todos nuestros estilos eran bien vernáculos, folclóricos. Siento que sembré una semillita, porque después nació Guaza, Limón, Sandía, todos eran frutas. Después me independicé y dejé de hacer diseño gráfico y me dediqué solo al Nuevo Lenguaje Maya. Hasta cierto punto siento que mi Nuevo Lenguaje Maya podría ser todavía más moderno. Pero al mismo tiempo siento que como tiene el componente educativo, las líneas tienen que ser claras y concisas para perseguir ese objetivo.

¿Y ahora qué sigue?
En el libro también presento algunas aplicaciones de los jeroglíficos a marcas. Estoy trabajando en una nueva serie que tiene que ver con los dioses del inframundo. Pero hay un millón de fuentes de inspiración, la verdad; depende de lo que incluya el brief sigo investigando. En el caso de la nueva serie, solo he podido investigar las vasijas, ya no son jeroglíficos estándar. Por ejemplo, los murciélagos aparecen de formas distintas en las vasijas, pero hay rasgos específicos que se repiten en todos, como que tenían manchas de jaguar.

Dice que no se considera una experta en jeroglíficos ni en antropología. ¿En quiénes se apoyó para empaparse de la mística de este lenguaje de símbolos?
Me entrevisté con algunas personas del British Museum, porque ahí tienen investigadores que están trabajando en eso. Recibí un curso con Timothy Laughton, profesor de la University de Essex, Inglaterra, y él también me dio un poco de asesoría con el proyecto. Vivir en Copán me fue de gran ayuda, porque ahí llegan los investigadores, antropólogos. Solo poder hablar con ellos ha sido bien enriquecedor para mí, que vengo del mundo del arte y del diseño.

¿Por qué decidió empezar con Joya de Cerén?
Primero, porque está en El Salvador y porque es un sitio en donde habitaba gente común. No eran grandes templos en donde se hacían rituales reales del gobierno. Básicamente se descubren aspectos de la vida cotidiana, que yo pienso que uno como persona común se relaciona más fácilmente con eso. Yo quería que tuvieran ese efecto de narrativa para que ayudara a la comprensión del sitio.

¿Cuál fue el proceso que siguió hasta terminar en el Nuevo Lenguaje Maya?
En el posgrado presenté la clasificación y redibujé los jeroglíficos tal cual, los vectoricé y todavía no les puse color. Eso me sirvió para hacer la relación con su pensamiento, que es parte del proceso de empatía con el artista. A partir de eso, fue la misma necesidad de comunicar, en este caso los contenidos de Joya de Cerén, para apoyar las infografías de la señalización. No le encontraba sentido a que tuvieran infografía globalizada. La necesidad de querer darle vida a la historia a través de recursos visuales locales fue lo que hizo que nacieran mis conceptos. No existía en el lenguaje de ellos, por ejemplo, un jeroglífico de volcán en erupción, pero sí existían subjeroglíficos. Lo que he hecho es recombinarlos o recomponerlos y darles un significado más relevante. No son parte del vocabulario político.

¿A qué se refiere con la empatía del artista?
Es lo que a mí me gusta llamar el ojo del diseñador, que ve más allá de lo que una persona normal observa. En este caso, de intuir un poco las intenciones de los artistas mayas, pero informado por previas investigaciones de la parte epigráfica. Hay cosas que son y no son, por ejemplo hay uno en donde aparece un niño con la cabeza partida y es como un hombrecito, que quiere decir que es el nacimiento de la planta del maíz… Así es todo en ellos, muy mitológico, metafórico, semántico, y por eso digo que me ayudó estar en Copán, porque es como que estén ahí todavía. Se siente que el rey ahí es Yax Kuk Mo, el primer rey de Copán. Están bien cerca de la cultura, todo está bien palpable y grita ¡aquí estamos! Y esto era parte del objetivo de ellos, hacer que sus mensajes se vieran. Hay gente que ha visto el libro y ha llorado, porque lo ven como una ventana a algo que no entendían.

Dije con diseño de Frida Larios, que representa la Hacienda San Lucas, en Copán. Como toda su obra inspirada en el arte de los glifos mayas, sus conceptos están dotados de un significado lingüístico y cultural.
Dije con diseño de Frida Larios, que representa la Hacienda San Lucas, en Copán. Como toda su obra inspirada en el arte de los glifos mayas, sus conceptos están dotados de un significado lingüístico y cultural.

¿Cree que la campaña de expectación que se montó con el bak’tun y el supuesto fin del mundo ayudó a que la gente conociera más sobre esta cultura?
Para mí fue un poco decepcionante porque no hubo una sincronía entre los gobiernos de todos los países que forman parte del Mundo Maya. No se vino a oír sobre eso sino hasta octubre y noviembre, y tenían que haber empezado desde 2010 a hacer una campaña de relaciones públicas, empezar por lo menos a crear noticias al respecto de los mayas de una forma positiva. Este era el inicio de una nueva era. Para ellos todas las fechas claves de su calendario eran celebradas con rituales. Todo: el fin del verano, el inicio de la época lluviosa, todo tenía razón de ser. Esto no era el fin del mundo, obviamente, porque eso solo fue amarillismo, pero sí fue una fecha muy significativa.

¿Cómo se ve la cultura de El Salvador del siglo XXI desde fuera?
Se lo respondo a través de una anécdota: en una feria mundial llevaron un stand de El Salvador hace algunos años, y los banners promocionales eran sobre la industria en El Salvador, la maquila, una cosa totalmente ajena. Los japoneses llegaron al stand y se preguntaron dónde está la cultura de El Salvador, casi se sintieron como mofados porque ellos querían ver las raíces históricas y no cosas que no tienen trasfondo. Pienso que esa parte es la que falta. Mi parte es de lo maya, y es algo que en todo sentido puede ser informativo como propuesta, empezando desde los diseños locales inspirados en tendencias nórdicas. No soy la primera en hacerlo, pero sí he persistido bastante y eso ha tenido un pequeño impacto.

¿Su papel como embajadora de Indigo para Centroamérica busca paliar estos vacíos?
El diseño transforma y da otra visión. Ahorita básicamente lo que se está haciendo es crear vínculos y proponer proyectos que tengan base en la región centroamericana, sobre todo en la gente maya que vive y que tiene poco conocimiento o contacto. Lo ideal sería que hubiera más conciencia cultural y yo lo estoy haciendo desde lo visual, pero hay miles de fuentes de inspiración.

¿Qué tipo de proyectos?
Empezar proyectos como el Nuevo Lenguaje Maya que tenga aplicación en otros lenguajes, y documentarlos; hacer colaboraciones para que sean difundidas a través del portal y que se puedan hacer en el futuro otros congresos regionales. La región tiene muchas cosas que nos unen culturalmente. Pero no hay algo específico. Ahorita lo que estamos haciendo es replanteando Indigo para plantearlo localmente.

¿No hay conversaciones aún con los países de Centroamérica?
Yo he hecho varios contactos para hacer algo regional, pero todavía no hay nada específico. El único proyecto es el de hacer una publicación en donde se documenten todas las investigaciones que se están dando en la región en conexión con el diseño indígena.

Y aquí en El Salvador, ¿con quiénes se ha puesto en contacto: con la Secretaría de Cultura?
Estaba en contacto con ellos cuando aún era Concultura, pero han cambiado tanto que no tiene continuidad. Todo ahorita lo estoy haciendo independiente, con Indigo. En un punto dije: los medios de comunicación son la mayor arma que hay para difundir ideas en estos momentos, entonces no se necesita realmente de un gobierno. Sería lo ideal. Ahorita con el gobierno de Funes no he tratado de hacer ningún contacto. No me di por vencida, pero es difícil. Hay muchisisíma burocracia.

¿A qué atribuye la falta de interés por parte del Estado en difundir las raíces culturales?
No existe determinación. Le pongo de ejemplo el sistema de escritura de los mayas. Ellos tenían ese sistema de escritura que era común en toda Mesoamérica durante 500 años. Eso requeriría una determinación… muchas Secretarías de Cultura durante muchos años y todas de acuerdo en el CA4, por decir. Es casi imposible. Solo se ponen de acuerdo para negociar con los Estados Unidos y todo lo relacionado con las maquilas, ese tipo de cosas que se ven beneficiosas para un país, y la verdad es que es lo peor que puede pasar, porque los campesinos abandonan la autosostenibilidad por ir a trabajar a una maquila por 1.50 dólares al día, ¿qué dignidad hay en eso? Y esas son las cosas que le preocupan a los gobiernos… Al pasado Ministerio de Turismo lo que le preocupaba era cuántas habitaciones de hotel puede tener El Salvador para albergar a los ejecutivos que venían a hacer negocios al país. Estuvo enfocado solamente en la parte de negocios. Las preocupaciones son otras.

¿Cómo se percibe desde fuera el papel que desempeña el artista en la sociedad salvadoreña?
Creo que falta un programa de becas para que un artista se tome un año y se dedique a desarrollar una obra. No se han dado los recursos, ni el contexto, ni los programas para que se dé aquí en El Salvador. Para mí eso sería algo sencillo que se tendría que hacer para que realmente haya una práctica menos de subsistencia. Hay muchos artistas que tienen un trabajo de día, y de noche hacen su arte o sacan sus productos artesanales. Son pocos los que se pueden dedicar de lleno y decir “vivo de mi arte”, y que tengan un espacio o su propio estudio. Es como un círculo vicioso, el artista necesita tener un ambiente en donde se aprecie ese arte y en El Salvador es poco lo que se ofrece, muy poco. Se necesita apoyar a los artistas y tener programas que apoyen su estilo de vida. Hay tanto trabajo en el gobierno que se puede hacer para cambiar muchas cosas, incluyendo los programas educativos, y contratan, por ejemplo, a agencias de publicidad que muchas veces son franquicia de una agencia en Nueva York o Londres, que son globalizadas, en vez de darle espacio u oportunidad a artistas locales. Por ejemplo, el logotipo de la marca país.

¿El de los tres engranajes?
Sin comentarios… o sea, terrible. Ni sé qué agencia lo hizo, pero fue una de las globales. Realmente decepcionante.

¿Y el logotipo del Bicentenario qué le pareció?
Horrible.

Ese salió, precisamente, de un proyecto de los alumnos de la Mónica Herrera.
No sabía yo quién lo había hecho, pero puedo decir que no me gusta. Yo di clases en la escuela y mucha de mi cátedra fue de proyectos culturales. Falta investigación, eso es lo primero. Y para hacerla se necesita tiempo, y alguien tiene que financiar ese tiempo. En el caso de las universidades, para eso están, son las que deberían de liderar esos cambios.


Vea un poco del Nuevo Lenguaje Maya, la propuesta de Frida Larios

Cada ejemplar del libro es hecho a mano por la autora, con técnica de serigrafía

sobre papel Fabriano; la portada y la contraportada están prensadas con madera barnizada.

Para adquirirlo se hace un pedido directo a Larios a través de su página web.

El precio por unidad es de 300 dólares con pasta duras y $200 con pasta suave.

Extracto del libro “New Maya Language”, de Frida Larios.

NUEVA VIDA #MAYA: Book, Paintings, Photo, Jewellery and Fashion Expo and Conference Opens Today

Art, Design, Fashion design, Frida Larios, Graphic Design, Guatemala, Jewellery Design, Language, Mexico, New Maya Language, Photography, Photojournalism, Sustainable Design, Tyler Orsburn

NUEVA VIDA MAYA

NEW MAYA LANGUAGE conference, book presentation, paintings, jewellery, and dress collection; and NEW MAYA LIFE wood-printed photography series in collaboration with my husband Tyler Orsburn, opens today at 18.30 at the Embassy of México in Guatemala.

La Embajada de México en Guatemala
tiene el gusto de invitarle a la inauguración
de la exposición y conferencia:

NUEVA VIDA MAYA

Libro, pintura, fotografía*, joyería y
textiles de la artista Frida Larios

Jueves 17 de enero del 2013
18.30 horas
Centro Cultural “Luis Cardoza y Aragón”
Embajada de México
*En colaboración con el fotoperiodista Tyler Orsburn
La muestra permanecerá abierta hasta el 22 de febrero
en horario de 9.00 a 17.00 horas de lunes a viernes

New Maya Life Exhibition Nov 26, 2012-Mar 3, 2013 Museo para la Identidad Nacional @fridalarios @tylerorsburn

Art, Copan, Design, Fashion design, Frida Larios, Graphic Design, Jewellery Design, Language, New Maya Language, Photography, Photojournalism, Tegucigalpa, Tyler Orsburn

Our first husband and wife collaboration: NEW MAYA LIFE [Nueva Vida Maya] photo, paintings and fashion exhibition, is being hosted by Museo para la Identidad Nacional from November 26, 2012 – March 3, 2013. NEW MAYA LIFE highlights the more than 2000-year-old indigenous Maya culture. Their contemporary art, craft and daily life is celebrated through our picto-graphic interpretations.

www.fridalarios.com

www.vimeo.com/tylerorsburn

ACAS-UniversityCollegeLondon-low-01

The Anglo Central American Society invites you to a lecture about the Mayan Predictions: Maya: End of Days?

When? Wednesday, 24 October 2012 at 6pm

Where? Denys Holland Lecture Theatre, UCL Faculty of Laws, Bentham House, Endsleigh Gardens, WC1H 0EG London

Who? Lectures by Elizabeth Graham, PhD; Elizabeth Baquedano, PhD and Francisco Diego, PhD

NEW MAYA LANGUAGE sustainable jewellery pieces, book and toy exhibition by Frida Larios.

Members – £5
Non-members – £10
UCL students – Free

With many thanks to ACAS [through its Chairman, Judith Pollard, and Vice-chairman, Edith Ball] for supporting the New Maya Language cultural and sustainable message.

www.anglocasociety.org.uk

Art, Copan, Frida Larios, Jewellery Design, Language, London, New Maya Language, Sustainable Design

“Frida Larios: Businesswoman, Artisan, Preservationist” #NewMayaLanguage Feature Interview by Hat Trick Magazine, UK

Art, Copan, Design, Fashion design, Frida Larios, Graphic Design, Jewellery Design, Language, London, New Maya Language, Photography, Photojournalism, Sarawak, Sustainable Design, Tyler Orsburn, Washington DC

Excerpt from Hat Trick Magazine 9-page feature in their September 2012, Volume 1 Issue 2.

Frida Larios, International Indigenous Design Network (INDIGO) Ambassador, designer and creator of a new pictographic language.

1. Tell us a little bit about yourself?
I think it is safe to say that I am a multi-tasker extraordinaire. I went to a private German School (odd thing I know, but it was only a block away from my parents house) in San Salvador where I was raised. My peers in school always remember me painting with a full set of large-format paper, brushes and temperas displayed on my desk while paying attention and participating in a lesson about heavy German, Bertolt Brecht-type literature–all at the same time. I was attracted to both: art and sports since I was a little girl. From five until fifteen I was a gymnast representing my country at international level. I then moved on to indoor volleyball where I was part of the national team for five years and finally settled with beach volleyball. From 1996 until 2003 me and my partner were reigning Central American champions traveling in the FIVB Beach Volleyball World Tour across Europe and South America. Beach volleyball was my passion, but design was equally as inspiring and important to me, I had learned that since my school days, so I never ceased to do either. It wasn’t easy as it meant waking up at 5am every day for practice so that I could have a full day of study, while I was finishing college, or designing, while I was managing my design studio. Then in 2003 I moved to London to study a masters degree in communication design in one of the most prestigious design schools in the world: Central Saint Martins College of Art & Design sponsored by the government of El Salvador through a sister fullbright scholarship programme. I had already lived on and off in London and the west coast of England while I was completing a bachelors degree in Graphic Design at University College Falmouth.

2. What was the inspiration behind your New Mayan Language Art Project?
Being far away from my home country while living in London, but at the same time being so close to one of the mecca’s of contemporary art and culture brought me close to my own roots. Central Saint Martins College of Art & Design was two blocks away from the British Museum in Holborn, which holds the most beautiful carved lintels in the Maya world from the Yaxchilán site. Being in touch with both: thousands of years old and at the same time the most contemporary art expressions sparked the idea of reviving the dead Maya hieroglyphic language.

Continue reading the rest of the 12-question interview in Hat Trick’s ISSUU edition page 28.