Frida, Maya Language and Joya de Cerén [English version]

Art, Design, Frida Larios, Graphic Design, Indigenous, Language, New Maya Language, Sustainable Design
SAMSUNG CSC

Frida Larios’s murals at the Joya de Cerén Archaeological Park

Note: This article was originally published in Spanish on the blogs of El Faro newspaper in San Salvador, El Salvador.

Thank you, HondurasWeekly.com for translating to a wider audience./

Written by  Miguel Huezo Mixco

Ancestral heritage needs to reinvent itself, or die. Design, with its ability to synthesize and develop, interpret and create realities, is a powerful tool for representing and reviving our past. For these purposes, Frida Larios has created a “new Maya language.” The past is not a “sacred” place. The gods did not inspire the creators of the Temple of the Great Jaguar in Tikal, and the sculptors of the stelae at Copán. Neither artisans at Joya de Cerén. The “sacred” becomes untouchable and just an elected group possesses the power to change it. Such ideas produce arbitrary behavior.

The demolition of Fernando Llort’s mural, in 2011, was attempted to be justified by saying it contained signs outside the Catholic tradition, and the artist was accused of commercially promoting himself, as if that was sin. You have to be alert when there is pontification in the name of religion or science…

It is worth remembering these sad events, because now some sustain that the mural of Frida Larios in Joya de Ceren Archaeological Park in San Juan Ópico, El Salvador, is a kind of profanation to the spirit of the ancestors. Many of us do not think alike, and believe that the mural has given a new shine to that extraordinary place.

Because in El Salvador there has not been a constructive debate on the social uses of heritage, the idea prevails that the valuation of the past is an exclusive power of historians, archaeologists and restorers. But we must not forget that artists have a central role in this task. In this case, design in its many branches, is crucial so that more people appreciate and preserve their patrimonial heritage; as García Canclini says so that “the past has a future”.

The mural offers a version of the destruction of the ancient settlement of Joya de Ceren by a volcanic eruption, which occurred in the seventh century AC, with iconography sustained on the graph of the old village artisans. The enhancement of Joya de Ceren’s World Heritage, happens, among other reasons, for the need of the historian and archaeologist’s account to intersect and be combined with the artist’s.

El Salvador has a rich cultural heritage that is still undervalued and under enhanced. In part, because the matter has been addressed with a conservationist strategy. Cultural policy has a huge challenge to be linked conceptually to other networks, such as tourism, mass communication, entertainment, and with the social context of inequality and poverty that serves as a framework. This will open to us the possibilities offered by new languages, including art, so that the past matters to us, so that it becomes actual. (8/30/14)

Advertisements

Children’s book: The Village that was Buried by an Erupting Volcano by @fridalarios

Design, El Salvador, Frida Larios, Language, New Maya Language, Washington DC

Publicado para los niños y niñas de mesoamérica el 6 de marzo de 2014 por la Dirección Nacional de Patrimonio Cultural, Secretaría de Cultura de la Presidencia, con el apoyo de Boquitas DIANA de Centroamérica./Published for all Mesoamerican boys and girls on march 6, 2014 by the Dirección Nacional de Patrimonio Cultural, Secretaría de Cultura de la Presidencia, with the support of DIANA de Centroamérica.

Versión trilingüe: español, inglés y pictoglifos© del Nuevo Lenguaje Maya©. Con una actividad de cortar, pegar y crear pictoglifos©/Trilingual version: English, Spanish and New Maya Language© pictoglyphs©. With a cut, paste and pictoglyph© creation activity.

La Aldea que fue Sepultada por un Volcán en Erupción es la verdadera historia acerca de una comunidad de población Indígena maya que fue sepultada y preservada por ceniza volcánica por casi 1500 años. Abriendo con un prefacio del Dr. Payson Sheets, arqueólogo del sitio, fue escrita e ilustrada por Larios. La narrativa fue inspirada en su primer hijo Yax (el Niño Verde) y el sitio arqueológico Patrimonio de la Humanidad de UNESCO: Joya de Cerén. 

The Village that was Buried by an Erupting Volcano is the real story about a community of Maya Indigenous peoples buried and preserved under volcanic ash for nearly 1500 years. Opening with a foreword by the site’s archaeologist, Payson Sheets, PhD, it was written and illustrated by Larios. The narrative was inpired by her first son Yax (the Green Child) and the UNESCO World Heritage Joya de Cerén archaeological site. 
PREFACIO

Estoy contento y honrado de escribir un prefacio al maravilloso libro de niños de Frida Larios sobre el antiguo pueblo maya de Joya de Cerén. Debido a que personas de todas la edades vivían y jugaban en su pueblo Maya hace unos 1400 años, desde bebés y niños hasta los adultos y las personas mayores, es oportuno que la información sobre la vida en la aldea se difunda a los salvadoreños y de todas las edades. Estoy profundamente satisfecho de que Frida Larios ha escrito e ilustrado este libro para que los niños pueden aprender sobre su herencia profunda desde hace tantos siglos. En Joya de Cerén vemos las raíces de las familias salvadoreñas de hoy. Y las necesidades básicas
de las familias de hoy en día son muy parecidas a las de ayer, ya que los padres necesitan alimentar y vestirse a ellos mismos y sus hijos, y proporcionar refugio. Ellos necesitan almacenar y procesar los alimentos, y tienen que cooperar con sus vecinos para el mejoramiento de todos. Es mi esperanza que este cautivante libro sea ampliamente disponible para los salvadoreños y otros que visitan el sitio arqueológico, y en muchos otros lugares en todo el país. Todos tenemos una deuda de gratitud con Frida Larios.

Payson Sheets, PhD
Profesor del Departamento de Antropología Universidad de Colorado, Boulder, EE. UU.

FOREWORD

I am pleased and honored to write a foreword to Frida Larios’ wonderful child’s book about the ancient Maya village of Joya de Ceren. Because all ages of people lived and played in their Maya village about 1400 years ago, from babies and children to adults and the elderly, it is appropriate that information about life in the village be disseminated to Salvadorans of all ages today. I am deeply gratified that Frida Larios has written and illustrated this book so children can learn about their deep heritage from so many centuries ago. At Joya de Ceren we see the roots of Salvadoran families of today. And the basic needs of today’s families are much like those of today, as parents need to feed and clothe themselves and their children, and provide shelter. They need to store and process food, and they need to cooperate with their neighbors for the betterment of all. It is my hope that this compelling book be widely available to Salvadorans and others that visit the archaeological site, and in many other venues all across the country. We all owe a debt of gratitude to Frida Larios.

Payson Sheets, Phd
Professor, Department of Anthropology University of Colorado, Boulder, USA 

Front Cover

Front Cover

End paper

End paper

Foreword

Foreword

Story page 1

Story page 1

Bio and summary

Bio and summary

End paper

End paper

Taller en el sitio

Taller en el exterior del Centro de Interpretación del parque arqueológico de Joya de Cerén con niños del Colegio Alfonsina Storni del Sitio del Niño

Taller en el sitio

Taller en el exterior del Centro de Interpretación del parque arqueológico de Joya de Cerén con niños del Colegio Alfonsina Storni del Sitio del Niño

Edición

Edición

“Frida Larios: Businesswoman, Artisan, Preservationist” #NewMayaLanguage Interview by Hat Trick Magazine, UK

Art, Copan, Design, El Salvador, Fashion design, Frida Larios, Graphic Design, Guatemala, Jewellery Design, Kuching, Language, London, New Maya Language, Sustainable Design, Tyler Orsburn

I had previously published an excerpt of this interview; this is the editable full text version. You can see spreads and access the original interview here. Minor up-dates have been made to the text.

Frida Larios, International Indigenous Design Network (INDIGO) Ambassador, designer and creator of a new pictographic language.

1. Tell us a little bit about yourself?
I think it is safe to say that I am a multi-tasker extraordinaire. I went to a private German School (odd thing I know, but it was only a block away from my parents house) in San Salvador where I was raised. My peers in school always remember me painting with a full set of large-format paper, brushes and temperas displayed on my desk while paying attention and participating in a lesson about heavy German, Bertolt Brecht-type literature–all at the same time. I was attracted to both: art and sports since I was a little girl. From five until fifteen I was a gymnast representing my country at international level. I then moved on to indoor volleyball where I was part of the national team for five years and finally settled with beach volleyball. From 1996 until 2003 me and my partner were reigning Central American champions traveling in the FIVB Beach Volleyball World Tour across Europe and South America. Beach volleyball was my passion, but design was equally as inspiring and important to me, I had learned that since my school days, so I never ceased to do either. It wasn’t easy as it meant waking up at 5am every day for practice so that I could have a full day of study, while I was finishing college, or designing, while I was managing my design studio. Then in 2003 I moved to London to study a masters degree in communication design in one of the most prestigious design schools in the world: Central Saint Martins College of Art & Design sponsored by the government of El Salvador through a sister Fulbright scholarship programme by FANTEL/LASPAU/Harvard. I had already lived on and off in London and the west coast of England while I was completing a bachelors degree in Graphic Design at University College Falmouth.

2. What was the inspiration behind your New Mayan Language Art Project?
Being far away from my home country while living in London, but at the same time being so close to one of the mecca’s of contemporary art and culture brought me close to my own roots. Central Saint Martins College of Art & Design was two blocks away from the British Museum in Holborn, which holds the most beautiful carved lintels in the Maya world from the Yaxchilán site. Being in touch with both: thousands of years old and at the same time the most contemporary art expressions sparked the idea of reviving the dead Maya hieroglyphic language.

There were other important motivations too. As an educator to first year Graphic Design students in San Salvador in what was my first Professor position at the young age of 26, I discovered that they were tending to imitate northern graphic styles. Like in many design disciplines the norm is to look to what is fashionable in the western world, rather than sourcing from your own native background. Au contraire, natives have been discriminated in the Mesoamerican region (modern Central America) for centuries since Spanish colonial times. When a teenager wants to say to another that they are being “uncool” they say: “No seas indio! (don’t be an indigenous.)” This says us a lot of the inner sentiments towards our native ancestors. I am hoping my project is a humble inspiration to those young designers so that they too start looking inside their local heritage for innovation.

3. When did you know that you wanted to be an artist? Ever since I was in middle school. I would sell hand-crafted cards for valentines and mothers day to my school mates. I knew I wanted to become a graphic designer then, but never knew I would be taken beyond that initial call and become so passionate about my culture and its application in different disciplines. Some people take time to find out their intent in life, some people never find out, and I feel incredibly grateful that I have always been guided to do what I love.

My mother has been a flower designer and artist, she has always had an eye for what is aesthetically enhancing in her environment and a love for nature. My father is a master in fito pathology (study of plant diseases) who researched the natural balance between insects and crops. I think this is why I have a systematic and organic way of approaching design. I can actually say I do come from a family of artists and sporties. Gabriela Larios the sister who follows me, is an illustrator and surface designer living in London. She is also a former national El Salvador team representative in cycling. My “little” sister Andrea Jeffcoat lives in Nashville, Tennessee. She studied ceramic jewellery art and is a fab Zumba instructor.

4. What was your discipline in Art School? My bachelors degree was in Graphic Design; my thesis at University College Falmouth was also a culturally rooted project. My masters degree was in Communication Design with an emphasis in typography and historically relevant wayshowing. My masters thesis was my New Maya Language project which was originally inspired by the content of a UNESCO World Heritage archaeological site in El Salvador buried under volcanic ash for 1500 years and unearthed in the 1970’s–similar to the Pompeii in Italy archaeological park.

After our Central Saint Martins masters exhibition at the Mall Galleries in London, I continued to evolve my project–like many of my talented peers who have also been commended for their own unique projects.

It’s been nearly ten years now since I conceived the New Maya Language and it has certainly developed into a multiple avenues project that has life in: sign, typography, surface, fashion, accessory, and educational toy design. It even has the potential to become an iPhone app to teach children about the Maya language.

In my vision: It has no limits. I am willing to expand it as far as my imagination takes it with the intent of making my culture (or a part of it) known to the world, to my fellow Mesoamerican citizens, and to the living Maya themselves.

5. What kind of classes did you teach at the London College of Fashion?
I taught Digital Surface Design for Textiles as part of different fashion related courses. Because of my graphics background and Adobe Creative Suite software knowledge I was able to guide their digital creative process. I was always impressed by their innate ability to express patterns using crafted or digitally generated visual resources. You can see some of my students surface designs outcome in this video on my YouTube channel.

6. How do you currently define the relationship between art & fashion?
All the art and design fields are blending these days, there are no boundaries as brands look to provide their audiences with unusual ideas. Collaborations between bloggers and fashion designers or between actors and musicians, for example, are at the order of day. It would be nice to see even less common collaborations that brought awareness about cultural, social, health and environmental issues to the mainstream public. Only major brands have the power to access a truly worldwide audience and they need to be even more conscious of their role and how they influence even the youngest minds these days.

7. Where can we find your book on the New Maya Language?
The 115-page, 100% hand-bound New Maya Language book is printed on thick 160 gsm water-colour paper, and translated in four languages: English, Spanish, Maya, and visually. It beautifully compiles and decodes the New Maya Language project. The first chapter explains the complex original Maya hieroglyphic language. The second chapter’s large illustrations provide the formula for each New Maya Language pictogram. And finally, the third chapter showcases various design applications used by governmental and private entities.

Renowned Peabody Museum, Harvard epigrapher Alexandre Tokovinine describes the works in my book with these words:

“Even though there has been a growing body of scholarly works devoted to the subject of Maya calligraphy, few artists systematically sought their inspiration in Maya letters beyond mere reproduction of certain glyphs and glyphic patterns, usually in the context of contemporary indigenous art.  Frida’s project stands apart as an attempt to explore and reinvent Maya calligraphy as a symbolic and aesthetic system from an artist’s viewpoint.  The New Maya Language creates its own world that blends Maya imagery and symbolism with Frida’s unique vision in a series of artworks which would make an ancient calligrapher proud.”

The book can be found at the Centre for Typographic Research at the Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing; at the White House in Washington DC, at the Embassy of El Salvador in The Hague and Paris; at the Museum of National Identity in Tegucigalpa; and in the hands of private collectors in Chicago, Paris, London, etc. It was the only Latin American typo-work selected for exhibition with 80 other from around the world, at Beijing Typography 2009 at the Central Academy of Fine Art in Beijing, China.

It can be purchased at Hacienda San Lucas in the Copan Maya archaeological site in Honduras and be custom ordered online through my website: http://www.fridalarios.com

Do you have artist that you look up to? If so, please tell us? Frida Kahlo, and not because of the name! But because she developed a visual surrealist movement that has indirectly influenced Latin American literature (Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Isabel Allende et. al) to date.

And of course: the Maya artists. They were renaissance men. Surely comparable to Leonardo, Rafael, Michelangelo, who were not only fine artists, they were architects, sculptors, interior designers, poets, and even engineers. In other words: liberal innovators. And so were the Maya artists who were Royal scribes and book keepers. In being so they held the knowledge of what they had to write about: history, politics, astronomy, mathematics, and art in general. Their beautiful calligraphic works are quite unknown to a non-Mayanist audience. No artist today can claim to master all these disciplines.

9. How can people learn more about you and your artwork and where to purchase?
The homepage on my website showcases the whole collection of picto-glyphs©. This is the series applied to paintings, prints, fashion, accessories and toy products.

We have a permanent gallery and Frida Larios boutique with my original artworks at Hacienda San Lucas located in the major Maya archaological site of Copán Ruinas, Honduras. Online, Pinterest is becoming a good place to view and purchase my paintings and products too: http://pinterest.com/fridalarios. Here you can also view photos of artworks displayed on collectors’ homes around the world. When you want to order people contact us directly through the contact form on my website.

10. Tell us more about the INDIGO group?
INDIGO is the International Indigenous Design Network a branch of ICOGRADA the International Council of Communication Design. INDIGO is an open platform that connects both Indigenous and non Indigenous designers worldwide in an effort to explore traditional design and its contemporary interpretations. INDIGO facilitates discussion, initiates collaborative projects, exhibitions and conferences but also showcases other relevant initiatives from all over the world. It seeks to understand design that is inspired by or rooted in Indigenous culture, traditions, imagery, lifestyle, etc.

We believe indigenous design should be a present and future innovation reference to designers who look to produce sustainable design concepts. Contemporary designers need to consider his or her local heritage at the time of designing–INDIGO encourages and reinforces this notion.

My role as an Advisor for INDIGO is to create an environment for the exchange of knowledge and ideas. I offer the network local access and insights, help shape projects and initiatives. I am very active within the network of Ambassadors. I am currently a member of the Sarawak, Malaysia International Design Week 2012 programming committee and other committees key to shaping the vision and future of INDIGO.

11. When did you know that you wanted to use your art to help people?
My projects, not only New Maya Language, have always had a cultural component. We used to run a design agency in San Salvador and London with my sister and our projects were used as case studies in various publications because they represented the Central American graphic spirit and style.

12. What are you future project plans? Any more language projects?
As always, I am multi-tasking galore. I just had a baby (two months old today!) and I have another wonderful four-year old. That would be enough for anyone, but not for Frida. I spent 2011 coming up with nine (yes only nine, but each one could be a whole thesis) new picto-glyphs© inspired by the Maya concept of the universe: the sky, the earth, and the underground. That is all I can say about them because they are still confidential and under a special key locked website. From this series I am working on a collaboration with Pattern People to create surface designs. Potential clients interested in this collection should contact us. I am also working on prototypes for a new jewellery collection.

One of the most exciting projects coming up is a collaboration with my sister Gabriela Larios and Miguel Hernández with Latinotype.com to release two new Central American typefaces.

We have a series of exhibition engagements with my talented photographer,husband Tyler Orsburn. The exhibition is called New Maya Life and shows both his intimate portraits of living Maya people and my New Maya hieroglyphics. New Maya Life was shown from November 2012 – February 2013 at the Honduran Museum for National Identity (Museo para la Identidad Nacional) accompanying a major University of Pennsylvania archaeological Maya exhibition called Maya 2012: Lords of Time; at the prestigious Centro Cultural Luis Cardoza y Aragón, part of the Embassy of Mexico in Guatemala; and at the John James Audubon Museum in Kentucky, USA in 2014.

And lastly, yes, I worked on a new language project in collaboration with a fellow INDIGO Ambassador. We hosted a workshop titled: Reinterpreting Malay Iconography into Contemporary Craft and Design during the ICOGRADA international Design Week in Sarawak, Malaysia from October 15 -21, 2012. See: sarawak.icograda.org/speakers

Thank you Frida for taking the time to let us know all about yourself!

Be sure to follow Frida and all her ventures via the following sites:

Browse: http://www.fridalarios.com
Subscribe: https://fridalarios.wordpress.com
Follow: http://twitter.com/fridalarios
Like: http://facebook.com/LariosFrida
Interest: http://pinterest.com/fridalarios

“L’alphabet maya des temps modernes” Section #Culture–Courrier international–no 1166 du 7-13 mars 2013 #NewMayaLanguage

Copan, Design, El Salvador, Frida Larios, Graphic Design, Language, New Maya Language, Paris, Sustainable Design

“Communiquer aujourd’hui en recyclant les pictogrammes précolombiens : c’est le projet ambitieux dans lequel s’est lancée la graphiste salvadorienne Frida Larios.” CourierInternational.com

Courrier International Spread 1

L’artiste salvadorienne Frida Larios s’est lancée dans un projet ambitieux : revisiter les hiéroglyphes précolombiens pour leur insuffler une nouvelle signification.

Poussée par le désir de s’extraire du quotidien, et lassée du minimalisme qui envahissait Londres [où elle était installée], la designer salvadorienne Frida Larios s’est lancée dans l’élaboration d’un “nouveau langage maya”. Elle a conçu un système visuel et conceptuel inspiré du système d’écriture précolombien. Pour cela, elle a redessiné les symboles ancestraux pour les adapter à la vie moderne, en remplaçant un élément du signifié par un autre, identifiable par nos contemporains.
Pour démarrer son projet [qui visait à l’origine à composer une nouvelle signalétique pour des sites archéologiques précolombiens], elle s’est entourée d’anthropologues et de chercheurs. Un lieu l’a beaucoup inspirée : l’Hacienda San Lucas, dans la ville de Copán [dans l’ouest du Honduras], située sur les ruines de la grande cité précolombienne de Copán. Sur place, s’enthousiasme-t-elle, flotte encore la présence sensible de Yax Kuk Mo, le premier roi de Copán [Ve siècle].
Ce travail a abouti à un premier livre, intitulé Nuevo lenguaje maya [“nouveau langage maya”, inédit en français]. Frida Larios y retrace l’histoire du site archéologique de Joya de Cerén, situé au Salvador. L’ouvrage passe également en revue toute une série d’articles textiles, de bijoux, de jouets éducatifs et de logos de marque que la designer a créés en s’inspirant des pictogrammes mayas. Les dix années qu’elle a passé hors du Salvador ne l’empêchent pas d’avoir une opinion bien arrêtée sur la façon dont le pays gère son héritage culturel.

Comment est-ce possible, alors que l’on réside à Londres, de se prendre d’intérêt pour la civilisation maya ?
C’est vrai, la culture précolombienne est la dernière chose à laquelle on pense quand on est à Londres. Mais la capitale britannique compose un environnement si avant-gardiste, si prompt à casser les codes, ancré dans une tradition artistique si particulière… C’est ce qui m’a donné envie de défis. En 2004, quand j’ai pris la décision de me consacrer aux hiéroglyphes, j’en avais assez du minimalisme ambiant. D’où ma décision de travailler sur les formes mayas, qui sont naturelles, organiques, riches de symbolisme – tout ce qui me fascine dans l’art précolombien.

Vous dites n’être experte ni en hiéroglyphes ni en anthropologie. Sur qui avez-vous pu compter pour vous imprégner du côté mystique de ce langage symbolique ?
C’est ma passion. J’avais déjà cette préoccupation quand j’ai fondé mon agence de design graphique il y a dix ans, ici au Salvador. J’avais un style inspiré du folklore, qui a par la suite fait école. Il est arrivé un moment où j’ai décidé d’arrêter le design pour me consacrer entièrement à mon “nouveau langage maya”. Je sens que je pourrais aller plus loin encore, dans une certaine mesure, être plus moderne. Mais, en même temps, la composante pédagogique du projet me contraint à une certaine clarté et concision.

Quels sont vos projets pour la suite ?
Dans mon livre, je présente déjà quelques transpositions de hiéroglyphes mayas à des fins commerciales. Je travaille aussi à un second volume, qui sera consacré aux dieux du monde souterrain. Mais franchement il y a des millions de sources d’inspiration possibles. Pour le volume en chantier, je n’ai pu étudier que les vases, je ne suis donc pas partie de hiéroglyphes classiques. Par
exemple, les chauves-souris y sont représentées de diverses façons, mais avec des traits récurrents, comme les taches du jaguar.

Vous dites n’être experte ni en hiéroglyphes ni en anthropologie. Sur qui avez-vous pu compter pour vous imprégner du côté mystique de ce langage symbolique ?
J’ai rencontré plusieurs chercheurs du British Museum qui travaillent sur le sujet. J’ai également suivi un cours avec Timothy Laughton, professeur à l’université de l’Essex, en Angleterre, qui m’a aussi conseillée pour mon projet. Par ailleurs, vivre à Copán m’a été très utile, parce que c’est le lieu de travail de nombreux chercheurs et anthropologues. Pouvoir parler avec eux a été très enrichissant, pour moi qui viens du monde des arts et du design.

Pourquoi vous êtes-vous d’abord intéressée au site Joya de Cerén ?
Tout d’abord, parce que le site se trouve au Salvador et que des gens ordinaires vivaient là. Il ne s’agissait pas de grands temples où avaient lieu les rituels officiels. Ce site donne à voir des aspects de la vie quotidienne, auxquels M. et Mme Tout-le- Monde peuvent plus facilement s’identifier.

Cette trame narrative aide à la compréhension du site. Comment avez-vous procédé pour
élaborer votre “nouveau langage maya”?
J’ai commencé par établir un classement des hiéroglyphes. Je les ai redessinés et vectorisés, mais sans leur donner de couleurs. Cela m’a servi de point d’entrée dans la pensée maya, pour initier un processus d’empathie avec l’artiste. Ensuite, des impératifs de la communication se sont imposés,
car il s’agissait de dessiner des logos. Il était impensable pour moi d’utiliser à ce moment une signalétique universelle. Les idées me sont venues naturellement, de la volonté de faire revivre l’Histoire à travers la signalétique locale. Par exemple, dans leur langage, le hiéroglyphe d’un volcan
en éruption n’existait pas, mais il y avait des sous-hiéroglyphes pour le composer. Je m’en suis servi pour créer de nouvelles combinaisons, de nouvelles compositions, et leur donner un sens plus fort.

Que voulez-vous dire par “empathie de l’artiste” ?
C’est ce que j’appelle l’oeil du créateur, il voit plus loin qu’un individu lambda. Dans ce cas précis, il s’agissait de percevoir les intentions des artistes mayas, mais à la lumière de recherches épigraphiques réalisées en amont. Il y a des signes qui ressemblent à quelque chose mais en désignent une autre : par exemple, ce hiéroglyphe qui montre un enfant à la tête fendue, aux airs
de petit homme, désigne en fait la naissance du maïs… Tout est comme ça chez les Mayas : tout est dans la mythologie, dans la métaphore, dans la sémantique. Et c’est pour cela qu’avoir vécu à Copán m’a aidée. C’est comme si les Mayas habitaient toujours le lieu. On a le sentiment que Yax Kuk Mo, le premier roi de Copán, continue de régner en maître. Des lecteurs ont pleuré en découvrant mon livre : pour eux, c’est comme s’il ouvrait une fenêtre sur quelque chose qu’ils ne comprenaient pas.

A quoi attribuez-vous le peu d’empressement de l’Etat salvadorien à diffuser l’histoire culturelle du pays ?
Il n’existe aucune volonté en ce sens. Prenons l’exemple du système d’écriture des Mayas. Ils ont fonctionné pendant cinq cents ans avec un mode de communication commun à toute la Méso-Amérique. Aujourd’hui, pour défendre ce patrimoine, il faudrait que tous les ministères de la
Culture concernés par cette région décident de coordonner leurs efforts.

—María Luz Nóchez

Repéres Frida Bio

Frida Larios, artista creadora del Nuevo Lenguaje #Maya: “Hay gente que vio el libro y lloró…” – ElFaro.net

Art, Design, Frida Larios, Graphic Design, Language, London, New Maya Language

“Hay gente que vio el libro y lloró porque lo vio como una ventana a algo que no entendían” – ElFaro.net.

Frida Larios, artista creadora del Nuevo Lenguaje Maya:

“Hay gente que vio el libro y lloró porque lo vio como una ventana a algo que no entendían”

Más de 2 mil jeroglíficos mayas han sido descifrados desde 1950 hasta la fecha, pero poco se ha conocido al respecto fuera del mundo académico. La diseñadora y artista salvadoreña Frida Larios ha empezado a reducir esta brecha con una audaz propuesta de escribir la actualidad con símbolos mayas. También habla críticamente sobre el panorama local para los artistas visuales.

Por María Luz Nóchez / Fotos: José Carlos Reyes

Publicado el 5 de Febrero de 2013

En su afán por salir de lo cotidiano y harta del minimalismo que empezaba a diluirse en la capital británica, la diseñadora salvadoreña Frida Larios decidió empezar su ruta hacia el Nuevo Lenguaje Maya. Desde antes de partir a Londres, Larios ya había empezado a experimentar con lo vernáculo y lo folclórico en sus diseños. Sus intenciones eran claras: quería estudiar las raíces culturales de El Salvador. En 2003, la diseñadora partió a la prestigiosa Central Saint Martins College of Arts and Desing, en Inglaterra. Para llegar hasta allá presentó un proyecto cultural aún sin definir para postularse y obtener una beca.

Larios ha creado un sistema visual y conceptual inspirado en el sistema de signos de los mayas. Su metodología se basa en rediseñar y aplicar a la vida contemporánea el sistema de símbolos de los mayas, intercambiando uno de los elementos de un significado por uno socialmente reconocido. Para ponerlo en marcha se auxilió de epígrafos, antropólogos, investigadores y, sobre todo, de la experiencia de vivir en la Hacienda San Lucas, en Santa Rosa de Copán (Honduras), en donde, según dice, aún se siente la presencia de Yax Kuk Mo, el primer rey de Copán.

Aunque su máster en comunicación del diseño complementó su perspectiva como artista visual para encontrar la fuerza de lectura y reconocimiento de los jeroglíficos que ha rediseñado, su interés por difundir sus raíces culturales lo relaciona con los 12 años en que representó al país como voleibolista de playa. “Es una mezcla bien rara, deporte y arte”, bromea, y reconoce que viajar a Brasil, Portugal y Estados Unidos y conocer la cultura de estos países fue parte de su inspiración y determinación para promover la propia, tomando como base el desconocimiento que en Mesoamérica se tiene sobre los más de 2 mil jeroglíficos que han sido descifrados hasta la fecha. Cabe destacar que lo más que enseña el sistema educativo sobre los símbolos mayas son los números.

Frida Larios, diseñadora gráfica, artista visual e investigadora salvadoreña. Embajadora de la Red Internacional de Diseño Indígena (Indigo por sus siglas en inglés), un proyecto en línea de diseño para promover las raíces culturales.
Frida Larios, diseñadora gráfica, artista visual e investigadora salvadoreña. Embajadora de la Red Internacional de Diseño Indígena (Indigo por sus siglas en inglés), un proyecto en línea de diseño para promover las raíces culturales.

Ahora, la artista y diseñadora representa a Centroamérica como embajadora de la Red Internacional de Diseño Indígena (Indigo), plataforma en línea que por medio de la práctica del diseño contribuye a la formación de identidades culturales. Su boleto de entrada fue su primera serie del Nuevo Lenguaje Maya que narra la historia del sitio arqueológico Joya de Cerén, ubicado al occidente de San Salvador. Esta primera serie se complementa con las aplicaciones que de estos conceptos la artista ha realizado en textiles, joyería, juguetes educativos e identidades de marca.

Una década de estar fuera de El Salvador no es algo que le juegue en contra a la hora de verter sus opiniones respecto a la manera en que se maneja visualmente la identidad cultural. Por el contrario, observar desde el exterior le permite tener una perspectiva más amplia y crítica sobre las cosas que está haciendo mal el sistema para promover a los artistas.

¿Cómo nació el interés por lo precolombino estando en Londres, una ciudad en donde no existe un referente inmediato de la cultura maya?
Sí, lo precolombino es lo último que se viene a la mente estando en Londres… pero precisamente ese ambiente que es tan avant garde, de romper esquemas, y con una tradición artística muy diferente a la de París, que es más femenina, te reta más. En 2004, cuando tomé la decisión de dedicarme a trabajar con los jeroglíficos, ya estaba un poco hastiada del minimalismo y decidí trabajar con las formas mayas, que son intrínsecas, orgánicas y todo tenía un simbolismo, y eso es lo que me fascina del pensamiento de los artistas mayas.

Más de 2 mil jeroglíficos han sido descifrados desde 1950, pero en su libro nos presenta alrededor de 25 nuevos.
Es mi pasión. Yo fundé un estudio de diseño gráfico hace 10 años acá en El Salvador y desde entonces ya tenía esas inquietudes, ya tenía esa filosofía y esa visión. Todos nuestros estilos eran bien vernáculos, folclóricos. Siento que sembré una semillita, porque después nació Guaza, Limón, Sandía, todos eran frutas. Después me independicé y dejé de hacer diseño gráfico y me dediqué solo al Nuevo Lenguaje Maya. Hasta cierto punto siento que mi Nuevo Lenguaje Maya podría ser todavía más moderno. Pero al mismo tiempo siento que como tiene el componente educativo, las líneas tienen que ser claras y concisas para perseguir ese objetivo.

¿Y ahora qué sigue?
En el libro también presento algunas aplicaciones de los jeroglíficos a marcas. Estoy trabajando en una nueva serie que tiene que ver con los dioses del inframundo. Pero hay un millón de fuentes de inspiración, la verdad; depende de lo que incluya el brief sigo investigando. En el caso de la nueva serie, solo he podido investigar las vasijas, ya no son jeroglíficos estándar. Por ejemplo, los murciélagos aparecen de formas distintas en las vasijas, pero hay rasgos específicos que se repiten en todos, como que tenían manchas de jaguar.

Dice que no se considera una experta en jeroglíficos ni en antropología. ¿En quiénes se apoyó para empaparse de la mística de este lenguaje de símbolos?
Me entrevisté con algunas personas del British Museum, porque ahí tienen investigadores que están trabajando en eso. Recibí un curso con Timothy Laughton, profesor de la University de Essex, Inglaterra, y él también me dio un poco de asesoría con el proyecto. Vivir en Copán me fue de gran ayuda, porque ahí llegan los investigadores, antropólogos. Solo poder hablar con ellos ha sido bien enriquecedor para mí, que vengo del mundo del arte y del diseño.

¿Por qué decidió empezar con Joya de Cerén?
Primero, porque está en El Salvador y porque es un sitio en donde habitaba gente común. No eran grandes templos en donde se hacían rituales reales del gobierno. Básicamente se descubren aspectos de la vida cotidiana, que yo pienso que uno como persona común se relaciona más fácilmente con eso. Yo quería que tuvieran ese efecto de narrativa para que ayudara a la comprensión del sitio.

¿Cuál fue el proceso que siguió hasta terminar en el Nuevo Lenguaje Maya?
En el posgrado presenté la clasificación y redibujé los jeroglíficos tal cual, los vectoricé y todavía no les puse color. Eso me sirvió para hacer la relación con su pensamiento, que es parte del proceso de empatía con el artista. A partir de eso, fue la misma necesidad de comunicar, en este caso los contenidos de Joya de Cerén, para apoyar las infografías de la señalización. No le encontraba sentido a que tuvieran infografía globalizada. La necesidad de querer darle vida a la historia a través de recursos visuales locales fue lo que hizo que nacieran mis conceptos. No existía en el lenguaje de ellos, por ejemplo, un jeroglífico de volcán en erupción, pero sí existían subjeroglíficos. Lo que he hecho es recombinarlos o recomponerlos y darles un significado más relevante. No son parte del vocabulario político.

¿A qué se refiere con la empatía del artista?
Es lo que a mí me gusta llamar el ojo del diseñador, que ve más allá de lo que una persona normal observa. En este caso, de intuir un poco las intenciones de los artistas mayas, pero informado por previas investigaciones de la parte epigráfica. Hay cosas que son y no son, por ejemplo hay uno en donde aparece un niño con la cabeza partida y es como un hombrecito, que quiere decir que es el nacimiento de la planta del maíz… Así es todo en ellos, muy mitológico, metafórico, semántico, y por eso digo que me ayudó estar en Copán, porque es como que estén ahí todavía. Se siente que el rey ahí es Yax Kuk Mo, el primer rey de Copán. Están bien cerca de la cultura, todo está bien palpable y grita ¡aquí estamos! Y esto era parte del objetivo de ellos, hacer que sus mensajes se vieran. Hay gente que ha visto el libro y ha llorado, porque lo ven como una ventana a algo que no entendían.

Dije con diseño de Frida Larios, que representa la Hacienda San Lucas, en Copán. Como toda su obra inspirada en el arte de los glifos mayas, sus conceptos están dotados de un significado lingüístico y cultural.
Dije con diseño de Frida Larios, que representa la Hacienda San Lucas, en Copán. Como toda su obra inspirada en el arte de los glifos mayas, sus conceptos están dotados de un significado lingüístico y cultural.

¿Cree que la campaña de expectación que se montó con el bak’tun y el supuesto fin del mundo ayudó a que la gente conociera más sobre esta cultura?
Para mí fue un poco decepcionante porque no hubo una sincronía entre los gobiernos de todos los países que forman parte del Mundo Maya. No se vino a oír sobre eso sino hasta octubre y noviembre, y tenían que haber empezado desde 2010 a hacer una campaña de relaciones públicas, empezar por lo menos a crear noticias al respecto de los mayas de una forma positiva. Este era el inicio de una nueva era. Para ellos todas las fechas claves de su calendario eran celebradas con rituales. Todo: el fin del verano, el inicio de la época lluviosa, todo tenía razón de ser. Esto no era el fin del mundo, obviamente, porque eso solo fue amarillismo, pero sí fue una fecha muy significativa.

¿Cómo se ve la cultura de El Salvador del siglo XXI desde fuera?
Se lo respondo a través de una anécdota: en una feria mundial llevaron un stand de El Salvador hace algunos años, y los banners promocionales eran sobre la industria en El Salvador, la maquila, una cosa totalmente ajena. Los japoneses llegaron al stand y se preguntaron dónde está la cultura de El Salvador, casi se sintieron como mofados porque ellos querían ver las raíces históricas y no cosas que no tienen trasfondo. Pienso que esa parte es la que falta. Mi parte es de lo maya, y es algo que en todo sentido puede ser informativo como propuesta, empezando desde los diseños locales inspirados en tendencias nórdicas. No soy la primera en hacerlo, pero sí he persistido bastante y eso ha tenido un pequeño impacto.

¿Su papel como embajadora de Indigo para Centroamérica busca paliar estos vacíos?
El diseño transforma y da otra visión. Ahorita básicamente lo que se está haciendo es crear vínculos y proponer proyectos que tengan base en la región centroamericana, sobre todo en la gente maya que vive y que tiene poco conocimiento o contacto. Lo ideal sería que hubiera más conciencia cultural y yo lo estoy haciendo desde lo visual, pero hay miles de fuentes de inspiración.

¿Qué tipo de proyectos?
Empezar proyectos como el Nuevo Lenguaje Maya que tenga aplicación en otros lenguajes, y documentarlos; hacer colaboraciones para que sean difundidas a través del portal y que se puedan hacer en el futuro otros congresos regionales. La región tiene muchas cosas que nos unen culturalmente. Pero no hay algo específico. Ahorita lo que estamos haciendo es replanteando Indigo para plantearlo localmente.

¿No hay conversaciones aún con los países de Centroamérica?
Yo he hecho varios contactos para hacer algo regional, pero todavía no hay nada específico. El único proyecto es el de hacer una publicación en donde se documenten todas las investigaciones que se están dando en la región en conexión con el diseño indígena.

Y aquí en El Salvador, ¿con quiénes se ha puesto en contacto: con la Secretaría de Cultura?
Estaba en contacto con ellos cuando aún era Concultura, pero han cambiado tanto que no tiene continuidad. Todo ahorita lo estoy haciendo independiente, con Indigo. En un punto dije: los medios de comunicación son la mayor arma que hay para difundir ideas en estos momentos, entonces no se necesita realmente de un gobierno. Sería lo ideal. Ahorita con el gobierno de Funes no he tratado de hacer ningún contacto. No me di por vencida, pero es difícil. Hay muchisisíma burocracia.

¿A qué atribuye la falta de interés por parte del Estado en difundir las raíces culturales?
No existe determinación. Le pongo de ejemplo el sistema de escritura de los mayas. Ellos tenían ese sistema de escritura que era común en toda Mesoamérica durante 500 años. Eso requeriría una determinación… muchas Secretarías de Cultura durante muchos años y todas de acuerdo en el CA4, por decir. Es casi imposible. Solo se ponen de acuerdo para negociar con los Estados Unidos y todo lo relacionado con las maquilas, ese tipo de cosas que se ven beneficiosas para un país, y la verdad es que es lo peor que puede pasar, porque los campesinos abandonan la autosostenibilidad por ir a trabajar a una maquila por 1.50 dólares al día, ¿qué dignidad hay en eso? Y esas son las cosas que le preocupan a los gobiernos… Al pasado Ministerio de Turismo lo que le preocupaba era cuántas habitaciones de hotel puede tener El Salvador para albergar a los ejecutivos que venían a hacer negocios al país. Estuvo enfocado solamente en la parte de negocios. Las preocupaciones son otras.

¿Cómo se percibe desde fuera el papel que desempeña el artista en la sociedad salvadoreña?
Creo que falta un programa de becas para que un artista se tome un año y se dedique a desarrollar una obra. No se han dado los recursos, ni el contexto, ni los programas para que se dé aquí en El Salvador. Para mí eso sería algo sencillo que se tendría que hacer para que realmente haya una práctica menos de subsistencia. Hay muchos artistas que tienen un trabajo de día, y de noche hacen su arte o sacan sus productos artesanales. Son pocos los que se pueden dedicar de lleno y decir “vivo de mi arte”, y que tengan un espacio o su propio estudio. Es como un círculo vicioso, el artista necesita tener un ambiente en donde se aprecie ese arte y en El Salvador es poco lo que se ofrece, muy poco. Se necesita apoyar a los artistas y tener programas que apoyen su estilo de vida. Hay tanto trabajo en el gobierno que se puede hacer para cambiar muchas cosas, incluyendo los programas educativos, y contratan, por ejemplo, a agencias de publicidad que muchas veces son franquicia de una agencia en Nueva York o Londres, que son globalizadas, en vez de darle espacio u oportunidad a artistas locales. Por ejemplo, el logotipo de la marca país.

¿El de los tres engranajes?
Sin comentarios… o sea, terrible. Ni sé qué agencia lo hizo, pero fue una de las globales. Realmente decepcionante.

¿Y el logotipo del Bicentenario qué le pareció?
Horrible.

Ese salió, precisamente, de un proyecto de los alumnos de la Mónica Herrera.
No sabía yo quién lo había hecho, pero puedo decir que no me gusta. Yo di clases en la escuela y mucha de mi cátedra fue de proyectos culturales. Falta investigación, eso es lo primero. Y para hacerla se necesita tiempo, y alguien tiene que financiar ese tiempo. En el caso de las universidades, para eso están, son las que deberían de liderar esos cambios.


Vea un poco del Nuevo Lenguaje Maya, la propuesta de Frida Larios

Cada ejemplar del libro es hecho a mano por la autora, con técnica de serigrafía

sobre papel Fabriano; la portada y la contraportada están prensadas con madera barnizada.

Para adquirirlo se hace un pedido directo a Larios a través de su página web.

El precio por unidad es de 300 dólares con pasta duras y $200 con pasta suave.

Extracto del libro “New Maya Language”, de Frida Larios.

“Frida Larios: Businesswoman, Artisan, Preservationist” #NewMayaLanguage Feature Interview by Hat Trick Magazine, UK

Art, Copan, Design, Fashion design, Frida Larios, Graphic Design, Jewellery Design, Language, London, New Maya Language, Photography, Photojournalism, Sarawak, Sustainable Design, Tyler Orsburn, Washington DC

Excerpt from Hat Trick Magazine 9-page feature in their September 2012, Volume 1 Issue 2.

Frida Larios, International Indigenous Design Network (INDIGO) Ambassador, designer and creator of a new pictographic language.

1. Tell us a little bit about yourself?
I think it is safe to say that I am a multi-tasker extraordinaire. I went to a private German School (odd thing I know, but it was only a block away from my parents house) in San Salvador where I was raised. My peers in school always remember me painting with a full set of large-format paper, brushes and temperas displayed on my desk while paying attention and participating in a lesson about heavy German, Bertolt Brecht-type literature–all at the same time. I was attracted to both: art and sports since I was a little girl. From five until fifteen I was a gymnast representing my country at international level. I then moved on to indoor volleyball where I was part of the national team for five years and finally settled with beach volleyball. From 1996 until 2003 me and my partner were reigning Central American champions traveling in the FIVB Beach Volleyball World Tour across Europe and South America. Beach volleyball was my passion, but design was equally as inspiring and important to me, I had learned that since my school days, so I never ceased to do either. It wasn’t easy as it meant waking up at 5am every day for practice so that I could have a full day of study, while I was finishing college, or designing, while I was managing my design studio. Then in 2003 I moved to London to study a masters degree in communication design in one of the most prestigious design schools in the world: Central Saint Martins College of Art & Design sponsored by the government of El Salvador through a sister fullbright scholarship programme. I had already lived on and off in London and the west coast of England while I was completing a bachelors degree in Graphic Design at University College Falmouth.

2. What was the inspiration behind your New Mayan Language Art Project?
Being far away from my home country while living in London, but at the same time being so close to one of the mecca’s of contemporary art and culture brought me close to my own roots. Central Saint Martins College of Art & Design was two blocks away from the British Museum in Holborn, which holds the most beautiful carved lintels in the Maya world from the Yaxchilán site. Being in touch with both: thousands of years old and at the same time the most contemporary art expressions sparked the idea of reviving the dead Maya hieroglyphic language.

Continue reading the rest of the 12-question interview in Hat Trick’s ISSUU edition page 28.

SCOPE Magazine publication: A world of icons, not alphabets

Art, Design, Frida Larios, Language, New Maya Language, Toronto

Via SCOPE Magazine in Toronto, Canada. Written by I. Garrick Mason

Frida Larios SCOPE Magazine

Reviving a dead language is not normally a recommended practice in communications: road signs in Latin (say, NON DEXTER VICISSIM instead of “No Right Turn”) are certain to cause more accidents than not, and billboards written in runic Old Norse will do little to increase sales and a great deal to confuse and annoy pedestrians.

Undaunted by such conventional advice, graphic designer Frida Larios has set about reviving and redesigning the pictographic language of the Maya civilization for use in the twenty-first century. Originally from El Salvador, Larios got her MA at the Central Saint Martins College of Art & Design in London, where she began her love affair with Mayan hieroglyphics in 2004. The “New Maya Language” that she developed is comprised of simple pictograms reworked and combined to communicate more complex concepts, and these images in turn are used in logos for Central American companies and in signage for regional historic sites.

Larios’s longer-run vision is not driven by the needs of institutions, however, but by the needs of people. She is acutely aware of the immense gap in the region between urbanized descendents of Spanish settlers and impoverished native communities in which modern-language literacy is all too rare. As she writes in a recent photo essay for the Indigo Design Network:

My ideal would be a world with no alphabetical words—where icons were the only language. This would help bridge the gap between illiteracy and emotional comprehension of a message. Some indigenous peoples who don’t know how to read or write the Spanish language nor their own heritage hieroglyphics’ codex, feel close to the New Maya Language pictograms because they don’t need to know the alphabet or numbers to understand it. It just comes to them naturally.

A 100% pictographic language bridges the gap between a once highly literate community now living extremely poor and undermined, and our modern era of over-information. In my vision, it is the answer to include minorities who are otherwise diminished by not being able to access the physical or digital world of information around them.

Intrigued? Larios publishes a gorgeous hand-bound book explaining the language and its components (it can be ordered here); to see more of her work visit her website. June 2011′s DESIGN> magazine also contains a fascinating essay by Larios about the project and the philosophy behind it.

Mother Tongue Exhibition Report From Taipei, Taiwan

Art, Design, Frida Larios, Graphic Design, Language, New Maya Language, Taipei

Written by Paola Torres, Frida Larios’ studio intern.

Being an international student, I felt flattered with my recent experience. As an Adobe Design Achievement Award finalist, I received a ticket to Taipei to attend the ADAA Awards, the Taipei World Design Expo 2011, and the 2011 IDA Congress. Taipei is an amasing city, with gorgeous monuments, a super well-organised transportation system, fabulous people, and of course, exotic food.

Once in Taipei, I had the opportunity to visit the Originality 100 – International Indigenous Cultural And Creative Design Exhibition at the National Taiwan University of the Arts’ Art Museum. This collection exhibited more than 100 pieces of international cross-cultural and domestic aboriginal designs. The designs originated from aboriginal cultures and totems, combining current design concepts and applications.

Mother Tongue exhibition is an INDIGO – the International Indigenous Design Network – project. It is a cross-cultural platform to open discussion around the role of contemporary indigenous design and to encourage collaborative projects that deepen our understanding of people’s culture in our visual world of this 21 century.

The exhibition’s introduction read like this:

Mother Tongue – a rapidly changing concept in a world where growing immigration affects not only the economic and social structure of the host

society, but also its culture and, as such, its language.

27 posters were selected from over 500 by designers from around the world. I felt proud when I contemplated the calligraphy poster design of my boss/mentor/teacher/inspiration, Frida Larios. The description of her Mayan poster, named yal-Child of Mother, read the following way:

The Maya natives of Mesoamerica, in their nearly 2000-year ancient hieroglyphic writing, pictured the “thumbs-up” hand as a symbol of harvesting, completing, and binding. In the case of the word ya-AL (yal), the harvest is a child – the fruits of the womb. In the same way our mother tongue is the product of our upbringing and culture. The flames represent the fire coming out of our mouth when we speak – when we speak with the passion of our native language.

I loved the idea of how designers nowadays are involved in this global culture. The role of designers here is crucial, and it is what will someday make a difference in our rapidly changing world. This exhibition was not just a design exhibition. I felt it was design for the people, for the world, its different cultures, and each others roots. Frida Larios, and the rest of the designers, deal with issues about life itself. It is not easy to understand cultures, especially when such racial differences are affecting our society. This exhibition was about a connection to the earth, about learning to accept diversity, and about respecting what others conceive as their Mother Tongue.

All photographs courtesy of Paola Torres, except were noted.

The Real Life Of Today’s Mayans

Copan, Frida Larios

The Mayans from Mesoamerica are one of the six founding pillars of early civilization. According to the Foundation for Mesoamerican Studies, they invented the concept of zero and devised one of the most accurate ways of measuring time in the history of the world. Their hieroglyphic writing is still very much unknown, apart from the elite few who knew it at the time and the academics who have deciphered it.

Harvard’s Peabody Museum epigrapher, Alexandre Tokovinine, believes ancient Maya hieroglyphs are the most elaborate and visually striking writing system in Pre-Columbian America. “Although some Maya texts, particularly those in the surviving manuscripts, are characterized by rather simple and straightforward execution of letters, most inscriptions on carved monuments, buildings, and painted vessels decidedly rival in beauty and visual complexity the best examples of calligraphy of the Old World,” he said.

For more than two years I was in close contact with a Maya-Chortí indigenous community while living in the mountains of Copán Ruinas, Honduras at Hacienda San Lucas eco-lodge and reserve. They are one of the last Honduran inheritors of the great Maya civilization that thrived from 1000 B.C. through 1500 A.D.

For a community of indigenous peoples whose ancestors managed to create an affluent empire and a sophisticated common writing system that was used across what is modern Central America, today they face harsh and constant economic and social struggle–certainly not an echo of their glorious past.

The lack of education sets them right at the bottom of the social system–right were the walls are made out of carton and children are raised amongst dirt. Children have to walk miles and cross rivers to get to school, most have to work while they are still infants to help feed their brothers and sisters. They can hardly afford to plant their own crops or make a self-sustainable decent living wage.

Their illiteracy affects them in their practical living. Maya-Chortí today cannot read the instructions on the pesticides they to use for their crops, which affects their health. They cannot read the instructions of a medical prescription so they self-medicate wrongly. They need help to cope with most jobs and many everyday situations, like dialing a number or reading a letter. Their lives are impaired and their greatest enemy is letters.

In contrast, our modern lives as middle class literate and even bilingual citizens revolves around the computer and information circulating in the global digital system called the World Wide Web, we are able to read books and labels and now most of us are computer literate. Indigenous populations in remote corners of the world cannot comprehend modern digital spreading, gathering or design of information because many cannot read or write. Their emergent needs are supporting a family of 10 on $2 per day, or getting to a hospital on foot that is 30 miles away. For an indigenous community that has little food, education or healthcare—digital communication and information design are the last things on their mind—unless it touched them by helping them understand the world of letters around them.

My ideal would be a world with no alphabetical words—where icons were the only language. This would help bridge the gap between illiteracy and emotional comprehension of a message. Some indigenous peoples who don’t know how to read or write the Spanish language nor their own heritage hieroglyphics’ codex, feel close to the New Maya Language pictograms because they don’t need to know the alphabet or numbers to understand it. It just comes to them naturally.

A 100% pictographic language bridges the gap between once a highly literate community now living extremely poor and undermined, and our modern era of over information. In my vision, it is the answer to include minorities who are otherwise diminished by not being able to access the physical or digital world of information around them.

Don Damasio in the picture is the father of Don Mundo, the New Maya Language indigenous stone-carver. Read about Don Mundo here. All photographs by Tyler Orsburn©.

Commemorating this meaningful day with words by Jonathan Sinclair, Head of Ancient Surfaces in North America:

2000-year old Maya archaeological site in Copán, Honduras

2000-year old Maya archaeological site in Copán, Honduras. Photo by Gloria Chávez.

“Life is too short for people not to contemplate their past. If your personal past experiences define who you are, imagine the wealth of knowledge we can acquire from the cumulative experiences of all of our ancestors that came before us.

Even though they are long gone they still expect the best of us because we are the fruits of their labor, their love for one another and to their land.

So let’s honor them by making them proud of their greatest achievement, us…

I love what you stand for and what you are doing. Mucho gusto Frida.”

Copan, Frida Larios, New Maya Language