Larios-photos-4

Talk: Ancient glyphs inspiring new Maya design at the Smithsonian Latino Center

Anthrodesign, Art, El Salvador, Guatemala, Talk, Washington DC

Published by Hola Cultura, Washington, DC, June, 2015

A Maya-inspired design by Frida Larios. Photo by Oliver Garretson

A Maya-inspired design by Frida Larios. Photo by Tyler Orsburn

At the Smithsonian Latino Center recently, two designers decked out in colorful Central American outfits discussed how the ancient art of their Mayan ancestors influences their work; a design methodology that goes beyond  artistic endeavor.

Frida Larios, an ambassador for the International Design Network, is the creator of the New Maya Language; a multimedia design project. She is an author, lecturer, facilitator, typography consultant and educational product designer. Originally from El Salvador, she sported a contemporary tunic styled with modernized indigenous symbols at the May 28 talk.

Manuel León is a multimedia graphic designer originally from Chichicastenago, Guatemala. He is the owner of the design studio Potencial Puro and the art director and website designer for the United States Institute of Peace.León was dressed head-to-toe in traditional Maya clothing.

While the indigenous regalia looked a bit out of place in the conference room of the Center’s Southwest Washington D.C. office building, they had the full attention of the small audience of Smithsonian staffers and others who take special interest in Latino or indigenous cultures.

Larios and León are in the midst of creating a Maya design collective dedicated to Maya knowledge, symbolism, and preservation of their identity as indigenous people.

Their similar methodologies and values brought them together. They draw a deep influence from the Maya to inspire new art forms, while using ancient symbolism as a means to inspire people of Mayan descent to take an interest in their rich cultural heritage. They look to inspire others to take an interest in their heritage as Mayans and build a common understanding of its relevance. It’s a design methodology that could be used with other indigenous cultures to help people discover aspects of their identity in the same way it helped Larios delve more deeply into her identity as a Salvadorian, she said.

By reinterpreting ancient symbols they aim to breath new life into them. Larios said they envision their Maya design collective will “preserve our heritage and make it relevant to today’s citizens, using design as a bridge.”

In other words, design is the medium through which they connect the past and the present by adapting the Mayan visual language in a way that is understood in today’s world. These changes could be seen as the changes any language goes through over the course of time. Likewise, adaptation prevents Mayan hieroglyphics from becoming merely the subject material for history books.

For Larios, pictograms are stories. In some of her work she utilizes pictograms everyone knows, like a skull and crossbones. Then, integrates this common symbol into modern symbols to create a new idea—a new Maya language. These symbols are incorporated into her various mediums such as clothing, jewelry, and art prints.

Manuel León, Awakening Ocelote

Manuel León, Awakening Ocelote

For León, his work is much more than art; philosophy inspires the story behind his visual designs. He said the book “Ensueños Cosmovisión Del Maiz” by Daniel Matul is a particularly guiding aspect with regard to his philosophy. Of the designs he presented, an image of an ocelot with four points stands out; a traditional glyph of an ocelot reinterpreted in mid-yawn. León named this visual interpretation “Awakening Ocelot”.

When asked how their work is perceived by the natives and community, they agreed it was welcomed, particularly children thoroughly enjoy it. Despite the interest children show in their work, they noted that there is certain competition when it comes inspiring children to take an interest in their cultural heritage. This competition comes from pop-culture phenomena, such the booming superhero movie franchises.

What is known of the Maya glyphs is largely from Archeological study. Larios’ and León’s reinterpretations often begin from these archeological interpretations. The Spanish Conquest was a breaking point in Maya culture; their language and the related knowledge of hieroglyphs were lost. Larios and León are trying to construct a conceptual bridge between the past and the
present.

“What you see here is not even the tip of the iceberg,” said Larios, referring to an entire lexicon of glyphs waiting to be integrated into a modern symbolism.

—Oliver Garretson

Frida Larios — “The Village That Was Buried by an Erupting Volcano” #Boulder Book Store signing

Anthropology, Colorado, Design, El Salvador, Graphic Design, Joya de Ceren, Maya, New Maya Language

Start: 10/02/2014 6:30 pm

Frida Larios will speak about and sign her new book, The Village That Was Buried by an Erupting Volcano, on Thursday, October 2nd at *6:30pm*, Boulder Book Store.

Frida Larios will speak about and sign her new book, The Village That Was Buried by an Erupting Volcano, on Thursday, October 2nd at *6:30pm*.

Frida Larios will speak about and sign her new book, The Village That Was Buried by an Erupting Volcano, on Thursday, October 2nd at *6:30pm*.

About the Book:
The Village that was Buried by an Erupting Volcano, written in Spanish and English, is the real story about a community of Maya Indigenous peoples buried and preserved under volcanic ash for nearly 1500 years. This children’s picture book opens with a foreword by the site’s archaeologist, Dr. Payson Sheets from University of Colorado Boulder.

Vouchers to attend are $5 and are good for $5 off the author’s featured book or a purchase the day of the event. Vouchers can be purchased in advance, over the phone, or at the door. Readers Guild Members can reserve seats for any in-store event.

Location:
1107 Pearl St
Boulder, Colorado
80302
United States

Event Image:

Frida Larios -- "The Village That Was Buried by an Erupting Volcano"

#WashingtonDC, Mount Pleasant Library Celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month with Author/Advocate #FridaLarios

Design, El Salvador, Frida Larios, Graphic Design, New Maya Language, Washington DC
District of Columbia Public Library is celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month with a New Maya Language book reading and workshop:
Date: Saturday, September 20, 2014 – 2 p.m.

In observance of Hispanic Heritage Month, author Frida Larios will present workshop and reading that will facilitate children’s (ages 4-11) discovery and question the unique visual world of letters and Mayan mythology. The trilingual (English, Spanish and New Language [Visual] Maya) children’s book, The Village That Was Buried by an Erupting Volcano (children’s book) and the Green Child wooden puzzle are the tools of this workshop and educational experience. In the Children’s Room on the 2nd floor of the Mount Pleasant Library.

Front Cover

Front Cover

District of Columbia Mount Pleasant Public Library, invitation

District of Columbia Mount Pleasant Public Library, invitation

Story, first double page spread

Story, first double page spread

Foreword by Payson Sheets, PhD, UC Boulder Professor

Foreword by Payson Sheets, PhD, University of Colorado Boulder Professor

Frida, Maya Language and Joya de Cerén [English version]

Art, Design, Frida Larios, Graphic Design, Indigenous, Language, New Maya Language, Sustainable Design
SAMSUNG CSC

Frida Larios’s murals at the Joya de Cerén Archaeological Park

Note: This article was originally published in Spanish on the blogs of El Faro newspaper in San Salvador, El Salvador.

Thank you, HondurasWeekly.com for translating to a wider audience./

Written by  Miguel Huezo Mixco

Ancestral heritage needs to reinvent itself, or die. Design, with its ability to synthesize and develop, interpret and create realities, is a powerful tool for representing and reviving our past. For these purposes, Frida Larios has created a “new Maya language.” The past is not a “sacred” place. The gods did not inspire the creators of the Temple of the Great Jaguar in Tikal, and the sculptors of the stelae at Copán. Neither artisans at Joya de Cerén. The “sacred” becomes untouchable and just an elected group possesses the power to change it. Such ideas produce arbitrary behavior.

The demolition of Fernando Llort’s mural, in 2011, was attempted to be justified by saying it contained signs outside the Catholic tradition, and the artist was accused of commercially promoting himself, as if that was sin. You have to be alert when there is pontification in the name of religion or science…

It is worth remembering these sad events, because now some sustain that the mural of Frida Larios in Joya de Ceren Archaeological Park in San Juan Ópico, El Salvador, is a kind of profanation to the spirit of the ancestors. Many of us do not think alike, and believe that the mural has given a new shine to that extraordinary place.

Because in El Salvador there has not been a constructive debate on the social uses of heritage, the idea prevails that the valuation of the past is an exclusive power of historians, archaeologists and restorers. But we must not forget that artists have a central role in this task. In this case, design in its many branches, is crucial so that more people appreciate and preserve their patrimonial heritage; as García Canclini says so that “the past has a future”.

The mural offers a version of the destruction of the ancient settlement of Joya de Ceren by a volcanic eruption, which occurred in the seventh century AC, with iconography sustained on the graph of the old village artisans. The enhancement of Joya de Ceren’s World Heritage, happens, among other reasons, for the need of the historian and archaeologist’s account to intersect and be combined with the artist’s.

El Salvador has a rich cultural heritage that is still undervalued and under enhanced. In part, because the matter has been addressed with a conservationist strategy. Cultural policy has a huge challenge to be linked conceptually to other networks, such as tourism, mass communication, entertainment, and with the social context of inequality and poverty that serves as a framework. This will open to us the possibilities offered by new languages, including art, so that the past matters to us, so that it becomes actual. (8/30/14)

Children’s book: The Village that was Buried by an Erupting Volcano by @fridalarios

Design, El Salvador, Frida Larios, Language, New Maya Language, Washington DC

Publicado para los niños y niñas de mesoamérica el 6 de marzo de 2014 por la Dirección Nacional de Patrimonio Cultural, Secretaría de Cultura de la Presidencia, con el apoyo de Boquitas DIANA de Centroamérica./Published for all Mesoamerican boys and girls on march 6, 2014 by the Dirección Nacional de Patrimonio Cultural, Secretaría de Cultura de la Presidencia, with the support of DIANA de Centroamérica.

Versión trilingüe: español, inglés y pictoglifos© del Nuevo Lenguaje Maya©. Con una actividad de cortar, pegar y crear pictoglifos©/Trilingual version: English, Spanish and New Maya Language© pictoglyphs©. With a cut, paste and pictoglyph© creation activity.

La Aldea que fue Sepultada por un Volcán en Erupción es la verdadera historia acerca de una comunidad de población Indígena maya que fue sepultada y preservada por ceniza volcánica por casi 1500 años. Abriendo con un prefacio del Dr. Payson Sheets, arqueólogo del sitio, fue escrita e ilustrada por Larios. La narrativa fue inspirada en su primer hijo Yax (el Niño Verde) y el sitio arqueológico Patrimonio de la Humanidad de UNESCO: Joya de Cerén. 

The Village that was Buried by an Erupting Volcano is the real story about a community of Maya Indigenous peoples buried and preserved under volcanic ash for nearly 1500 years. Opening with a foreword by the site’s archaeologist, Payson Sheets, PhD, it was written and illustrated by Larios. The narrative was inpired by her first son Yax (the Green Child) and the UNESCO World Heritage Joya de Cerén archaeological site. 
PREFACIO

Estoy contento y honrado de escribir un prefacio al maravilloso libro de niños de Frida Larios sobre el antiguo pueblo maya de Joya de Cerén. Debido a que personas de todas la edades vivían y jugaban en su pueblo Maya hace unos 1400 años, desde bebés y niños hasta los adultos y las personas mayores, es oportuno que la información sobre la vida en la aldea se difunda a los salvadoreños y de todas las edades. Estoy profundamente satisfecho de que Frida Larios ha escrito e ilustrado este libro para que los niños pueden aprender sobre su herencia profunda desde hace tantos siglos. En Joya de Cerén vemos las raíces de las familias salvadoreñas de hoy. Y las necesidades básicas
de las familias de hoy en día son muy parecidas a las de ayer, ya que los padres necesitan alimentar y vestirse a ellos mismos y sus hijos, y proporcionar refugio. Ellos necesitan almacenar y procesar los alimentos, y tienen que cooperar con sus vecinos para el mejoramiento de todos. Es mi esperanza que este cautivante libro sea ampliamente disponible para los salvadoreños y otros que visitan el sitio arqueológico, y en muchos otros lugares en todo el país. Todos tenemos una deuda de gratitud con Frida Larios.

Payson Sheets, PhD
Profesor del Departamento de Antropología Universidad de Colorado, Boulder, EE. UU.

FOREWORD

I am pleased and honored to write a foreword to Frida Larios’ wonderful child’s book about the ancient Maya village of Joya de Ceren. Because all ages of people lived and played in their Maya village about 1400 years ago, from babies and children to adults and the elderly, it is appropriate that information about life in the village be disseminated to Salvadorans of all ages today. I am deeply gratified that Frida Larios has written and illustrated this book so children can learn about their deep heritage from so many centuries ago. At Joya de Ceren we see the roots of Salvadoran families of today. And the basic needs of today’s families are much like those of today, as parents need to feed and clothe themselves and their children, and provide shelter. They need to store and process food, and they need to cooperate with their neighbors for the betterment of all. It is my hope that this compelling book be widely available to Salvadorans and others that visit the archaeological site, and in many other venues all across the country. We all owe a debt of gratitude to Frida Larios.

Payson Sheets, Phd
Professor, Department of Anthropology University of Colorado, Boulder, USA 

Front Cover

Front Cover

End paper

End paper

Foreword

Foreword

Story page 1

Story page 1

Bio and summary

Bio and summary

End paper

End paper

Taller en el sitio

Taller en el exterior del Centro de Interpretación del parque arqueológico de Joya de Cerén con niños del Colegio Alfonsina Storni del Sitio del Niño

Taller en el sitio

Taller en el exterior del Centro de Interpretación del parque arqueológico de Joya de Cerén con niños del Colegio Alfonsina Storni del Sitio del Niño

Edición

Edición

95 years, 95 posters: Frida Larios poster selected for the #Mandela Poster Project Collection

Africa, Art, El Salvador, Frida Larios, Graphic Design, Honduras, Language, New Maya Language, South Africa, Tegucigalpa, Tyler Orsburn

Emerging-Underworld-Serpent-2-OUT-01  Photo courtesy of Eyescape 976336_486329781451007_1499123082_o 1072602_486329108117741_528142740_o Luis Yañez (Mexico) 1074829_485817071502278_842916305_o Alexis Tapia (Mexico) University of Pretoria  Photo courtesy of University of Pretoria  Photo courtesy of Ben Curtis.  Photo courtesy of Ben Curtis.  Photo courtesy of Ben Curtis.  Judge Yvonne Mokgoro, chairwoman  of the Nelson Mandela Children's Fund  Photo courtesy of Eyescape© 057444

Pretoria, South Africa – In May 2013, a group of South African designers came up with than idea to celebrate the life of Nelson Mandela by collecting 95 exceptional posters from around the world, honouring Madiba’s lifelong contribution to humanity.

The independent team of volunteers, now known as the Mandela Poster Project Collective, gave freely of their time and expertise to make the exceptional happen: In 60 days more than 700 posters were submitted by designers from more than 70 countries. The collection was curated and 95 posters (representing 95 years of Madiba’s life) will be exhibited around the world and will eventually be auctioned by the Nelson Mandela Children’s Hospital Trust to raise funds. In lieu of the high calibre of works received, it was felt more works needed to be showcased than the original 95. Plans are underway for a limited edition publication showcasing 500 of the posters submissions. The collective echoes the sentiments of South Africa’s beloved former president when he said “a good head and a good heart are always a formidable combination.”

Selected designers for the Mandela Poster Project 95 exhibition collection:

Abbas Majidi (Iran)
Aimilios Galipis (Greece)
Alan Grobler (South Africa)
Albina Aleksiunaite (Lithuania)
Alessandro Di Sessa (Italy)
Alexis Tapia (Mexico)
Ana Ivette Valenzuela (Mexico)
Ana Paula Caldas (Brazil)
Anton Odhiambo (Kenya)
Aubin A Sadiki (Democratic Republic of the Congo/South Africa)
Bibi Seck (USA)
Bradley Kirshenbaum (South Africa)
Brenda Sanderson (Canada)
Bruno Porto (Brazil)
Byoung il Sun (South Korea)
Carlos Andrade (Venezuela)
Celesté Burger (South Africa)
Charis Tsevis (Greece)
Claudia Tello (Mexico)
COP Youth Congress (Trinidad and Tobago)
Cristina Chiappini (Italy)
David Copestakes (USA)
David Iker Sanchez (USA)
David Tartakover (Israel)
David Teveth (Israel)
Derek Flynn (Canada)
Diego Giovanni Bermúdez Aguirre (Colombia)
Dominic Evans (South Africa)
Don Ryun Chang (South Korea)
Eduard Čehovin (Slovinia)
Elizabeth Resnick (USA)
Ellen Shapiro (USA)
Fabio Do Prado (UK)
Fabio Testa (Brazil)
Félix Beltrán (Mexico)
Fernando Andreazi (Brazil)
Frances Frylinck (South Africa)
Francesco Mazzenga (Italy)
Frida Larios (Honduras/El Salvador)
Gareth Steele (South Africa)
Garth Walker (South Africa)
Germán Jiménez Pinilla (Colombia)
Gyula Gefin (Canada)
Hervé Matine (France)
Hon Bing-wah (China)
Interbrand Shanghai (Sijing Chen, Hung Hsiang, Miaojie Li, Chuan Jiang) (China)
Interbrand New York (USA) (Craig Stout, Ross Clugston, Jessica Vernick)
Interbrand New York (USA) (Annalisa Van Den Bergh, Kristin Labahn)
Ithateng Mokgoro (South Africa)
Jacques Lange (South Africa)
Jacqui Morris (South Africa)
Jasveer Sidhu (Malaysia)
Javier Bulacio (Argentina)
Jeffrey Rikhotso (South Africa)
Jimmy Ball (USA)
Joël Guenoun (France)
José Luis Hernández “Chepe” (Mexico)
Juan Madriz (Venezuela)
Kyosuke Nishiada (Canada)
Lauriel Coscia (South Africa)
Lavanya Asthana (India)
Levente Szabo (Belgium)
Lin You Ting (Taiwan)
Lola Coudignac (France)
Luis Yañez (Mexico)
Majid Abbasi (Iran)
Marcelo Aflalo (Brazil)
Marco Cannata (South Africa)
Marco Tóxico (Bolivia)
Maria Papaefstathiou (Greece)
Marian Bantjes (Canada)
Martin Joel (Botswana)
Mervyn Kurlansky (Denmark/UK/South Africa)
Mohammed Jogie (South Africa)
Najeeb Mahmood (India)
Onica Lekuntwane (Botswana)
Onur Kuran (Turkey)
Pepe Menéndez (Cuba)
Rafael Nascimento (Brazil)
Rafiq Elmansy (Egypt)
Robert L. Peters (Canada)
Roberto Vilchis (China)
Roy Villalobos (USA)
Russell Kennedy (Australia)
Sally Chambers (South Africa)
Sindiso Nyoni (aka R!OT) (Zimbabwe/South Africa)
Sophia SHIH (Taiwan)
Steve Rayner (South Africa)
Sulet Jansen (South Africa)
Theo Kontaxis (Greece)
Thomas Blankschøn (Germany)
Travis Kennedy (Australia)
Unnikrishna Menon Damodaran (Bahrain)
Vesna Brekalo (Slovenia)
Vitor Andrade (Brazil)
Wessel Matthews (South Africa)
William Taylor (South Africa)
Zarina Mendoza (USA)

Mandela Poster Project collection traveling exhibitions:

– University of Pretoria, Department of Visual Arts, Main Campus, 18–26 July 2013

– The exhibition is at HP head office in Johannesburg until 10 August (printed version – viewing by invitation only)

– TEDxJohannesburg, 15 August (digital version – only accessible to registered delegates)

– Open Design Expo, Cape Town City Hall, 21-31 August (printed version – open to the public)

– SA Innovation Summit, IDC Johannesburg, 27-28 August (digital version – only accessible to registered delegates)

– Johannesburg City Library, 1-30 September (printed version – open to the public)

– Arts Alive 2013, Zoo Lake & Mary Fitzgerald Square, Johannesburg, 1-7 September (digital version – open to the public)

More international venues and dates to be announced soon.

Website: mandelaposterproject.org
Facebook: Mandela Poster Project

“L’alphabet maya des temps modernes” Section #Culture–Courrier international–no 1166 du 7-13 mars 2013 #NewMayaLanguage

Copan, Design, El Salvador, Frida Larios, Graphic Design, Language, New Maya Language, Paris, Sustainable Design

“Communiquer aujourd’hui en recyclant les pictogrammes précolombiens : c’est le projet ambitieux dans lequel s’est lancée la graphiste salvadorienne Frida Larios.” CourierInternational.com

Courrier International Spread 1

L’artiste salvadorienne Frida Larios s’est lancée dans un projet ambitieux : revisiter les hiéroglyphes précolombiens pour leur insuffler une nouvelle signification.

Poussée par le désir de s’extraire du quotidien, et lassée du minimalisme qui envahissait Londres [où elle était installée], la designer salvadorienne Frida Larios s’est lancée dans l’élaboration d’un “nouveau langage maya”. Elle a conçu un système visuel et conceptuel inspiré du système d’écriture précolombien. Pour cela, elle a redessiné les symboles ancestraux pour les adapter à la vie moderne, en remplaçant un élément du signifié par un autre, identifiable par nos contemporains.
Pour démarrer son projet [qui visait à l’origine à composer une nouvelle signalétique pour des sites archéologiques précolombiens], elle s’est entourée d’anthropologues et de chercheurs. Un lieu l’a beaucoup inspirée : l’Hacienda San Lucas, dans la ville de Copán [dans l’ouest du Honduras], située sur les ruines de la grande cité précolombienne de Copán. Sur place, s’enthousiasme-t-elle, flotte encore la présence sensible de Yax Kuk Mo, le premier roi de Copán [Ve siècle].
Ce travail a abouti à un premier livre, intitulé Nuevo lenguaje maya [“nouveau langage maya”, inédit en français]. Frida Larios y retrace l’histoire du site archéologique de Joya de Cerén, situé au Salvador. L’ouvrage passe également en revue toute une série d’articles textiles, de bijoux, de jouets éducatifs et de logos de marque que la designer a créés en s’inspirant des pictogrammes mayas. Les dix années qu’elle a passé hors du Salvador ne l’empêchent pas d’avoir une opinion bien arrêtée sur la façon dont le pays gère son héritage culturel.

Comment est-ce possible, alors que l’on réside à Londres, de se prendre d’intérêt pour la civilisation maya ?
C’est vrai, la culture précolombienne est la dernière chose à laquelle on pense quand on est à Londres. Mais la capitale britannique compose un environnement si avant-gardiste, si prompt à casser les codes, ancré dans une tradition artistique si particulière… C’est ce qui m’a donné envie de défis. En 2004, quand j’ai pris la décision de me consacrer aux hiéroglyphes, j’en avais assez du minimalisme ambiant. D’où ma décision de travailler sur les formes mayas, qui sont naturelles, organiques, riches de symbolisme – tout ce qui me fascine dans l’art précolombien.

Vous dites n’être experte ni en hiéroglyphes ni en anthropologie. Sur qui avez-vous pu compter pour vous imprégner du côté mystique de ce langage symbolique ?
C’est ma passion. J’avais déjà cette préoccupation quand j’ai fondé mon agence de design graphique il y a dix ans, ici au Salvador. J’avais un style inspiré du folklore, qui a par la suite fait école. Il est arrivé un moment où j’ai décidé d’arrêter le design pour me consacrer entièrement à mon “nouveau langage maya”. Je sens que je pourrais aller plus loin encore, dans une certaine mesure, être plus moderne. Mais, en même temps, la composante pédagogique du projet me contraint à une certaine clarté et concision.

Quels sont vos projets pour la suite ?
Dans mon livre, je présente déjà quelques transpositions de hiéroglyphes mayas à des fins commerciales. Je travaille aussi à un second volume, qui sera consacré aux dieux du monde souterrain. Mais franchement il y a des millions de sources d’inspiration possibles. Pour le volume en chantier, je n’ai pu étudier que les vases, je ne suis donc pas partie de hiéroglyphes classiques. Par
exemple, les chauves-souris y sont représentées de diverses façons, mais avec des traits récurrents, comme les taches du jaguar.

Vous dites n’être experte ni en hiéroglyphes ni en anthropologie. Sur qui avez-vous pu compter pour vous imprégner du côté mystique de ce langage symbolique ?
J’ai rencontré plusieurs chercheurs du British Museum qui travaillent sur le sujet. J’ai également suivi un cours avec Timothy Laughton, professeur à l’université de l’Essex, en Angleterre, qui m’a aussi conseillée pour mon projet. Par ailleurs, vivre à Copán m’a été très utile, parce que c’est le lieu de travail de nombreux chercheurs et anthropologues. Pouvoir parler avec eux a été très enrichissant, pour moi qui viens du monde des arts et du design.

Pourquoi vous êtes-vous d’abord intéressée au site Joya de Cerén ?
Tout d’abord, parce que le site se trouve au Salvador et que des gens ordinaires vivaient là. Il ne s’agissait pas de grands temples où avaient lieu les rituels officiels. Ce site donne à voir des aspects de la vie quotidienne, auxquels M. et Mme Tout-le- Monde peuvent plus facilement s’identifier.

Cette trame narrative aide à la compréhension du site. Comment avez-vous procédé pour
élaborer votre “nouveau langage maya”?
J’ai commencé par établir un classement des hiéroglyphes. Je les ai redessinés et vectorisés, mais sans leur donner de couleurs. Cela m’a servi de point d’entrée dans la pensée maya, pour initier un processus d’empathie avec l’artiste. Ensuite, des impératifs de la communication se sont imposés,
car il s’agissait de dessiner des logos. Il était impensable pour moi d’utiliser à ce moment une signalétique universelle. Les idées me sont venues naturellement, de la volonté de faire revivre l’Histoire à travers la signalétique locale. Par exemple, dans leur langage, le hiéroglyphe d’un volcan
en éruption n’existait pas, mais il y avait des sous-hiéroglyphes pour le composer. Je m’en suis servi pour créer de nouvelles combinaisons, de nouvelles compositions, et leur donner un sens plus fort.

Que voulez-vous dire par “empathie de l’artiste” ?
C’est ce que j’appelle l’oeil du créateur, il voit plus loin qu’un individu lambda. Dans ce cas précis, il s’agissait de percevoir les intentions des artistes mayas, mais à la lumière de recherches épigraphiques réalisées en amont. Il y a des signes qui ressemblent à quelque chose mais en désignent une autre : par exemple, ce hiéroglyphe qui montre un enfant à la tête fendue, aux airs
de petit homme, désigne en fait la naissance du maïs… Tout est comme ça chez les Mayas : tout est dans la mythologie, dans la métaphore, dans la sémantique. Et c’est pour cela qu’avoir vécu à Copán m’a aidée. C’est comme si les Mayas habitaient toujours le lieu. On a le sentiment que Yax Kuk Mo, le premier roi de Copán, continue de régner en maître. Des lecteurs ont pleuré en découvrant mon livre : pour eux, c’est comme s’il ouvrait une fenêtre sur quelque chose qu’ils ne comprenaient pas.

A quoi attribuez-vous le peu d’empressement de l’Etat salvadorien à diffuser l’histoire culturelle du pays ?
Il n’existe aucune volonté en ce sens. Prenons l’exemple du système d’écriture des Mayas. Ils ont fonctionné pendant cinq cents ans avec un mode de communication commun à toute la Méso-Amérique. Aujourd’hui, pour défendre ce patrimoine, il faudrait que tous les ministères de la
Culture concernés par cette région décident de coordonner leurs efforts.

—María Luz Nóchez

Repéres Frida Bio

Frida Larios, artista creadora del Nuevo Lenguaje #Maya: “Hay gente que vio el libro y lloró…” – ElFaro.net

Art, Design, Frida Larios, Graphic Design, Language, London, New Maya Language

“Hay gente que vio el libro y lloró porque lo vio como una ventana a algo que no entendían” – ElFaro.net.

Frida Larios, artista creadora del Nuevo Lenguaje Maya:

“Hay gente que vio el libro y lloró porque lo vio como una ventana a algo que no entendían”

Más de 2 mil jeroglíficos mayas han sido descifrados desde 1950 hasta la fecha, pero poco se ha conocido al respecto fuera del mundo académico. La diseñadora y artista salvadoreña Frida Larios ha empezado a reducir esta brecha con una audaz propuesta de escribir la actualidad con símbolos mayas. También habla críticamente sobre el panorama local para los artistas visuales.

Por María Luz Nóchez / Fotos: José Carlos Reyes

Publicado el 5 de Febrero de 2013

En su afán por salir de lo cotidiano y harta del minimalismo que empezaba a diluirse en la capital británica, la diseñadora salvadoreña Frida Larios decidió empezar su ruta hacia el Nuevo Lenguaje Maya. Desde antes de partir a Londres, Larios ya había empezado a experimentar con lo vernáculo y lo folclórico en sus diseños. Sus intenciones eran claras: quería estudiar las raíces culturales de El Salvador. En 2003, la diseñadora partió a la prestigiosa Central Saint Martins College of Arts and Desing, en Inglaterra. Para llegar hasta allá presentó un proyecto cultural aún sin definir para postularse y obtener una beca.

Larios ha creado un sistema visual y conceptual inspirado en el sistema de signos de los mayas. Su metodología se basa en rediseñar y aplicar a la vida contemporánea el sistema de símbolos de los mayas, intercambiando uno de los elementos de un significado por uno socialmente reconocido. Para ponerlo en marcha se auxilió de epígrafos, antropólogos, investigadores y, sobre todo, de la experiencia de vivir en la Hacienda San Lucas, en Santa Rosa de Copán (Honduras), en donde, según dice, aún se siente la presencia de Yax Kuk Mo, el primer rey de Copán.

Aunque su máster en comunicación del diseño complementó su perspectiva como artista visual para encontrar la fuerza de lectura y reconocimiento de los jeroglíficos que ha rediseñado, su interés por difundir sus raíces culturales lo relaciona con los 12 años en que representó al país como voleibolista de playa. “Es una mezcla bien rara, deporte y arte”, bromea, y reconoce que viajar a Brasil, Portugal y Estados Unidos y conocer la cultura de estos países fue parte de su inspiración y determinación para promover la propia, tomando como base el desconocimiento que en Mesoamérica se tiene sobre los más de 2 mil jeroglíficos que han sido descifrados hasta la fecha. Cabe destacar que lo más que enseña el sistema educativo sobre los símbolos mayas son los números.

Frida Larios, diseñadora gráfica, artista visual e investigadora salvadoreña. Embajadora de la Red Internacional de Diseño Indígena (Indigo por sus siglas en inglés), un proyecto en línea de diseño para promover las raíces culturales.
Frida Larios, diseñadora gráfica, artista visual e investigadora salvadoreña. Embajadora de la Red Internacional de Diseño Indígena (Indigo por sus siglas en inglés), un proyecto en línea de diseño para promover las raíces culturales.

Ahora, la artista y diseñadora representa a Centroamérica como embajadora de la Red Internacional de Diseño Indígena (Indigo), plataforma en línea que por medio de la práctica del diseño contribuye a la formación de identidades culturales. Su boleto de entrada fue su primera serie del Nuevo Lenguaje Maya que narra la historia del sitio arqueológico Joya de Cerén, ubicado al occidente de San Salvador. Esta primera serie se complementa con las aplicaciones que de estos conceptos la artista ha realizado en textiles, joyería, juguetes educativos e identidades de marca.

Una década de estar fuera de El Salvador no es algo que le juegue en contra a la hora de verter sus opiniones respecto a la manera en que se maneja visualmente la identidad cultural. Por el contrario, observar desde el exterior le permite tener una perspectiva más amplia y crítica sobre las cosas que está haciendo mal el sistema para promover a los artistas.

¿Cómo nació el interés por lo precolombino estando en Londres, una ciudad en donde no existe un referente inmediato de la cultura maya?
Sí, lo precolombino es lo último que se viene a la mente estando en Londres… pero precisamente ese ambiente que es tan avant garde, de romper esquemas, y con una tradición artística muy diferente a la de París, que es más femenina, te reta más. En 2004, cuando tomé la decisión de dedicarme a trabajar con los jeroglíficos, ya estaba un poco hastiada del minimalismo y decidí trabajar con las formas mayas, que son intrínsecas, orgánicas y todo tenía un simbolismo, y eso es lo que me fascina del pensamiento de los artistas mayas.

Más de 2 mil jeroglíficos han sido descifrados desde 1950, pero en su libro nos presenta alrededor de 25 nuevos.
Es mi pasión. Yo fundé un estudio de diseño gráfico hace 10 años acá en El Salvador y desde entonces ya tenía esas inquietudes, ya tenía esa filosofía y esa visión. Todos nuestros estilos eran bien vernáculos, folclóricos. Siento que sembré una semillita, porque después nació Guaza, Limón, Sandía, todos eran frutas. Después me independicé y dejé de hacer diseño gráfico y me dediqué solo al Nuevo Lenguaje Maya. Hasta cierto punto siento que mi Nuevo Lenguaje Maya podría ser todavía más moderno. Pero al mismo tiempo siento que como tiene el componente educativo, las líneas tienen que ser claras y concisas para perseguir ese objetivo.

¿Y ahora qué sigue?
En el libro también presento algunas aplicaciones de los jeroglíficos a marcas. Estoy trabajando en una nueva serie que tiene que ver con los dioses del inframundo. Pero hay un millón de fuentes de inspiración, la verdad; depende de lo que incluya el brief sigo investigando. En el caso de la nueva serie, solo he podido investigar las vasijas, ya no son jeroglíficos estándar. Por ejemplo, los murciélagos aparecen de formas distintas en las vasijas, pero hay rasgos específicos que se repiten en todos, como que tenían manchas de jaguar.

Dice que no se considera una experta en jeroglíficos ni en antropología. ¿En quiénes se apoyó para empaparse de la mística de este lenguaje de símbolos?
Me entrevisté con algunas personas del British Museum, porque ahí tienen investigadores que están trabajando en eso. Recibí un curso con Timothy Laughton, profesor de la University de Essex, Inglaterra, y él también me dio un poco de asesoría con el proyecto. Vivir en Copán me fue de gran ayuda, porque ahí llegan los investigadores, antropólogos. Solo poder hablar con ellos ha sido bien enriquecedor para mí, que vengo del mundo del arte y del diseño.

¿Por qué decidió empezar con Joya de Cerén?
Primero, porque está en El Salvador y porque es un sitio en donde habitaba gente común. No eran grandes templos en donde se hacían rituales reales del gobierno. Básicamente se descubren aspectos de la vida cotidiana, que yo pienso que uno como persona común se relaciona más fácilmente con eso. Yo quería que tuvieran ese efecto de narrativa para que ayudara a la comprensión del sitio.

¿Cuál fue el proceso que siguió hasta terminar en el Nuevo Lenguaje Maya?
En el posgrado presenté la clasificación y redibujé los jeroglíficos tal cual, los vectoricé y todavía no les puse color. Eso me sirvió para hacer la relación con su pensamiento, que es parte del proceso de empatía con el artista. A partir de eso, fue la misma necesidad de comunicar, en este caso los contenidos de Joya de Cerén, para apoyar las infografías de la señalización. No le encontraba sentido a que tuvieran infografía globalizada. La necesidad de querer darle vida a la historia a través de recursos visuales locales fue lo que hizo que nacieran mis conceptos. No existía en el lenguaje de ellos, por ejemplo, un jeroglífico de volcán en erupción, pero sí existían subjeroglíficos. Lo que he hecho es recombinarlos o recomponerlos y darles un significado más relevante. No son parte del vocabulario político.

¿A qué se refiere con la empatía del artista?
Es lo que a mí me gusta llamar el ojo del diseñador, que ve más allá de lo que una persona normal observa. En este caso, de intuir un poco las intenciones de los artistas mayas, pero informado por previas investigaciones de la parte epigráfica. Hay cosas que son y no son, por ejemplo hay uno en donde aparece un niño con la cabeza partida y es como un hombrecito, que quiere decir que es el nacimiento de la planta del maíz… Así es todo en ellos, muy mitológico, metafórico, semántico, y por eso digo que me ayudó estar en Copán, porque es como que estén ahí todavía. Se siente que el rey ahí es Yax Kuk Mo, el primer rey de Copán. Están bien cerca de la cultura, todo está bien palpable y grita ¡aquí estamos! Y esto era parte del objetivo de ellos, hacer que sus mensajes se vieran. Hay gente que ha visto el libro y ha llorado, porque lo ven como una ventana a algo que no entendían.

Dije con diseño de Frida Larios, que representa la Hacienda San Lucas, en Copán. Como toda su obra inspirada en el arte de los glifos mayas, sus conceptos están dotados de un significado lingüístico y cultural.
Dije con diseño de Frida Larios, que representa la Hacienda San Lucas, en Copán. Como toda su obra inspirada en el arte de los glifos mayas, sus conceptos están dotados de un significado lingüístico y cultural.

¿Cree que la campaña de expectación que se montó con el bak’tun y el supuesto fin del mundo ayudó a que la gente conociera más sobre esta cultura?
Para mí fue un poco decepcionante porque no hubo una sincronía entre los gobiernos de todos los países que forman parte del Mundo Maya. No se vino a oír sobre eso sino hasta octubre y noviembre, y tenían que haber empezado desde 2010 a hacer una campaña de relaciones públicas, empezar por lo menos a crear noticias al respecto de los mayas de una forma positiva. Este era el inicio de una nueva era. Para ellos todas las fechas claves de su calendario eran celebradas con rituales. Todo: el fin del verano, el inicio de la época lluviosa, todo tenía razón de ser. Esto no era el fin del mundo, obviamente, porque eso solo fue amarillismo, pero sí fue una fecha muy significativa.

¿Cómo se ve la cultura de El Salvador del siglo XXI desde fuera?
Se lo respondo a través de una anécdota: en una feria mundial llevaron un stand de El Salvador hace algunos años, y los banners promocionales eran sobre la industria en El Salvador, la maquila, una cosa totalmente ajena. Los japoneses llegaron al stand y se preguntaron dónde está la cultura de El Salvador, casi se sintieron como mofados porque ellos querían ver las raíces históricas y no cosas que no tienen trasfondo. Pienso que esa parte es la que falta. Mi parte es de lo maya, y es algo que en todo sentido puede ser informativo como propuesta, empezando desde los diseños locales inspirados en tendencias nórdicas. No soy la primera en hacerlo, pero sí he persistido bastante y eso ha tenido un pequeño impacto.

¿Su papel como embajadora de Indigo para Centroamérica busca paliar estos vacíos?
El diseño transforma y da otra visión. Ahorita básicamente lo que se está haciendo es crear vínculos y proponer proyectos que tengan base en la región centroamericana, sobre todo en la gente maya que vive y que tiene poco conocimiento o contacto. Lo ideal sería que hubiera más conciencia cultural y yo lo estoy haciendo desde lo visual, pero hay miles de fuentes de inspiración.

¿Qué tipo de proyectos?
Empezar proyectos como el Nuevo Lenguaje Maya que tenga aplicación en otros lenguajes, y documentarlos; hacer colaboraciones para que sean difundidas a través del portal y que se puedan hacer en el futuro otros congresos regionales. La región tiene muchas cosas que nos unen culturalmente. Pero no hay algo específico. Ahorita lo que estamos haciendo es replanteando Indigo para plantearlo localmente.

¿No hay conversaciones aún con los países de Centroamérica?
Yo he hecho varios contactos para hacer algo regional, pero todavía no hay nada específico. El único proyecto es el de hacer una publicación en donde se documenten todas las investigaciones que se están dando en la región en conexión con el diseño indígena.

Y aquí en El Salvador, ¿con quiénes se ha puesto en contacto: con la Secretaría de Cultura?
Estaba en contacto con ellos cuando aún era Concultura, pero han cambiado tanto que no tiene continuidad. Todo ahorita lo estoy haciendo independiente, con Indigo. En un punto dije: los medios de comunicación son la mayor arma que hay para difundir ideas en estos momentos, entonces no se necesita realmente de un gobierno. Sería lo ideal. Ahorita con el gobierno de Funes no he tratado de hacer ningún contacto. No me di por vencida, pero es difícil. Hay muchisisíma burocracia.

¿A qué atribuye la falta de interés por parte del Estado en difundir las raíces culturales?
No existe determinación. Le pongo de ejemplo el sistema de escritura de los mayas. Ellos tenían ese sistema de escritura que era común en toda Mesoamérica durante 500 años. Eso requeriría una determinación… muchas Secretarías de Cultura durante muchos años y todas de acuerdo en el CA4, por decir. Es casi imposible. Solo se ponen de acuerdo para negociar con los Estados Unidos y todo lo relacionado con las maquilas, ese tipo de cosas que se ven beneficiosas para un país, y la verdad es que es lo peor que puede pasar, porque los campesinos abandonan la autosostenibilidad por ir a trabajar a una maquila por 1.50 dólares al día, ¿qué dignidad hay en eso? Y esas son las cosas que le preocupan a los gobiernos… Al pasado Ministerio de Turismo lo que le preocupaba era cuántas habitaciones de hotel puede tener El Salvador para albergar a los ejecutivos que venían a hacer negocios al país. Estuvo enfocado solamente en la parte de negocios. Las preocupaciones son otras.

¿Cómo se percibe desde fuera el papel que desempeña el artista en la sociedad salvadoreña?
Creo que falta un programa de becas para que un artista se tome un año y se dedique a desarrollar una obra. No se han dado los recursos, ni el contexto, ni los programas para que se dé aquí en El Salvador. Para mí eso sería algo sencillo que se tendría que hacer para que realmente haya una práctica menos de subsistencia. Hay muchos artistas que tienen un trabajo de día, y de noche hacen su arte o sacan sus productos artesanales. Son pocos los que se pueden dedicar de lleno y decir “vivo de mi arte”, y que tengan un espacio o su propio estudio. Es como un círculo vicioso, el artista necesita tener un ambiente en donde se aprecie ese arte y en El Salvador es poco lo que se ofrece, muy poco. Se necesita apoyar a los artistas y tener programas que apoyen su estilo de vida. Hay tanto trabajo en el gobierno que se puede hacer para cambiar muchas cosas, incluyendo los programas educativos, y contratan, por ejemplo, a agencias de publicidad que muchas veces son franquicia de una agencia en Nueva York o Londres, que son globalizadas, en vez de darle espacio u oportunidad a artistas locales. Por ejemplo, el logotipo de la marca país.

¿El de los tres engranajes?
Sin comentarios… o sea, terrible. Ni sé qué agencia lo hizo, pero fue una de las globales. Realmente decepcionante.

¿Y el logotipo del Bicentenario qué le pareció?
Horrible.

Ese salió, precisamente, de un proyecto de los alumnos de la Mónica Herrera.
No sabía yo quién lo había hecho, pero puedo decir que no me gusta. Yo di clases en la escuela y mucha de mi cátedra fue de proyectos culturales. Falta investigación, eso es lo primero. Y para hacerla se necesita tiempo, y alguien tiene que financiar ese tiempo. En el caso de las universidades, para eso están, son las que deberían de liderar esos cambios.


Vea un poco del Nuevo Lenguaje Maya, la propuesta de Frida Larios

Cada ejemplar del libro es hecho a mano por la autora, con técnica de serigrafía

sobre papel Fabriano; la portada y la contraportada están prensadas con madera barnizada.

Para adquirirlo se hace un pedido directo a Larios a través de su página web.

El precio por unidad es de 300 dólares con pasta duras y $200 con pasta suave.

Extracto del libro “New Maya Language”, de Frida Larios.

Surface Asia Magazine Publication: Rediscovering @Icograda #NewMayaLanguage

Australia, Design, Fashion design, Frida Larios, Jewellery Design, Kuching, Language, New Maya Language, New Zealand, Sarawak, Sustainable Design
(CLOCKWISE FROM FAR LEFT) Iban Tattoos by Ernesto Kalum; Karijini National Park Visitor Centre by David Lancashire; The Teraph Cabinet series by Helmut Lueckenhausen; Green Child Puzzle by Frida Larios

(CLOCKWISE FROM FAR LEFT) Iban Tattoos by Ernesto Kalum; Karijini National Park Visitor Centre by David Lancashire; The Teraph Cabinet series by Helmut Lueckenhausen; Green Child Puzzle by Frida Larios

“In the process of globalisation, everybody is losing a bit of his individuality … It is very timely for us designers to explore this issue – to rediscover who we are, and to celebrate our unique heritage. Let us take a step back so that we can go forward.” Russell Kennedy, Icograda past president.

Text extract
Frida Larios is an Ambassador for INDIGO – the International Indigenous Design Network. Originally from San Salvador, Larios was inspired by Maya heritage, especially in the ancient Maya hieroglyphs. Her work during her postgraduate study gave birth to the “New Maya Language,” a set of twenty-three hieroglyphs that tells the story of her studied site, the Joya de Cerén UNESCO World Heritage Archaeological Site. The design process of “New Maya Language” involved streamlining the iconography of the ancient writing system and combining it with a modern visual vocabulary to create a standardised pictogram system that is comprehensible to contemporary audience. The result is a set of modern yet ancestral icons that is versatile in various applications: art, product and fashion design, brand identities, information design, wayfinding and education systems for archaeological sites and public spaces, as well as children’s toys. Larios says that:

“by reviving and celebrating the Maya cultural and visual identity, the ‘New Maya Language’ can inspire current and future generations and bring new life to the sacred stones.”

In keeping with the intention of safeguarding traditional culture, Larios has fostered close collaboration with indigenous craftsmen to produce items using local resources.
www.fridalarios.com

FridaLarios.WordPress.com 2012 Year in Review

Frida Larios, New Maya Language, Photojournalism, Washington DC

In 2012, there were 16 new posts, growing the total archive of this blog to 113 posts. There were 70 pictures uploaded, taking up a total of 24 MB. That’s about a picture per week.

The busiest day of the year was November 27th with 176 views. The most popular post that day was New Maya Life Exhibition Nov 26, 2012-Mar 3, 2013 Museo para la Identidad Nacional @fridalarios @tylerorsburn.

Attractions in 2012

These are the posts that got the most views in 2012:

Some of your most popular posts were written before 2012. Your writing has staying power!

Where did they come from?

Where did they come from?

That’s 121 countries in all!
Most visitors came from The United States. Mexico & El Salvador were not far behind.