#WashingtonDC, Mount Pleasant Library Celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month with Author/Advocate #FridaLarios

Design, El Salvador, Frida Larios, Graphic Design, New Maya Language, Washington DC
District of Columbia Public Library is celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month with a New Maya Language book reading and workshop:
Date: Saturday, September 20, 2014 – 2 p.m.

In observance of Hispanic Heritage Month, author Frida Larios will present workshop and reading that will facilitate children’s (ages 4-11) discovery and question the unique visual world of letters and Mayan mythology. The trilingual (English, Spanish and New Language [Visual] Maya) children’s book, The Village That Was Buried by an Erupting Volcano (children’s book) and the Green Child wooden puzzle are the tools of this workshop and educational experience. In the Children’s Room on the 2nd floor of the Mount Pleasant Library.

Front Cover

Front Cover

District of Columbia Mount Pleasant Public Library, invitation

District of Columbia Mount Pleasant Public Library, invitation

Story, first double page spread

Story, first double page spread

Foreword by Payson Sheets, PhD, UC Boulder Professor

Foreword by Payson Sheets, PhD, University of Colorado Boulder Professor

“Frida Larios: Businesswoman, Artisan, Preservationist” #NewMayaLanguage Feature Interview by Hat Trick Magazine, UK

Art, Copan, Design, Fashion design, Frida Larios, Graphic Design, Jewellery Design, Language, London, New Maya Language, Photography, Photojournalism, Sarawak, Sustainable Design, Tyler Orsburn, Washington DC

Excerpt from Hat Trick Magazine 9-page feature in their September 2012, Volume 1 Issue 2.

Frida Larios, International Indigenous Design Network (INDIGO) Ambassador, designer and creator of a new pictographic language.

1. Tell us a little bit about yourself?
I think it is safe to say that I am a multi-tasker extraordinaire. I went to a private German School (odd thing I know, but it was only a block away from my parents house) in San Salvador where I was raised. My peers in school always remember me painting with a full set of large-format paper, brushes and temperas displayed on my desk while paying attention and participating in a lesson about heavy German, Bertolt Brecht-type literature–all at the same time. I was attracted to both: art and sports since I was a little girl. From five until fifteen I was a gymnast representing my country at international level. I then moved on to indoor volleyball where I was part of the national team for five years and finally settled with beach volleyball. From 1996 until 2003 me and my partner were reigning Central American champions traveling in the FIVB Beach Volleyball World Tour across Europe and South America. Beach volleyball was my passion, but design was equally as inspiring and important to me, I had learned that since my school days, so I never ceased to do either. It wasn’t easy as it meant waking up at 5am every day for practice so that I could have a full day of study, while I was finishing college, or designing, while I was managing my design studio. Then in 2003 I moved to London to study a masters degree in communication design in one of the most prestigious design schools in the world: Central Saint Martins College of Art & Design sponsored by the government of El Salvador through a sister fullbright scholarship programme. I had already lived on and off in London and the west coast of England while I was completing a bachelors degree in Graphic Design at University College Falmouth.

2. What was the inspiration behind your New Mayan Language Art Project?
Being far away from my home country while living in London, but at the same time being so close to one of the mecca’s of contemporary art and culture brought me close to my own roots. Central Saint Martins College of Art & Design was two blocks away from the British Museum in Holborn, which holds the most beautiful carved lintels in the Maya world from the Yaxchilán site. Being in touch with both: thousands of years old and at the same time the most contemporary art expressions sparked the idea of reviving the dead Maya hieroglyphic language.

Continue reading the rest of the 12-question interview in Hat Trick’s ISSUU edition page 28.